Any case use the layer command in the usual manner

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any case, use the LAYER command in the usual manner; and remember that a separate set of "sheet definition" layers will be needed for each sheet to be defined in the drawing. Step 4 - Create One or More Viewports - The MVIEW command is used for this. MVIEW can automatically create from one to four viewports, or by clicking and dragging, the user can create rectangular viewports manually. Using MVIEW, create as many viewports as needed for the sheet being designed. The actual number of viewports, along with their relative sizes and aspect ratios aren't all that important at this stage; viewports can be added, erased, stretched and moved as needed as the work progresses. Step 5 - Enable Viewport Contents - Depending upon the settings of several AutoCAD system variables, each new viewport may be empty, or may contain every object in the Model Space drawing, or somewhere in between. This isn't critical, because the VPLAYER command lets the user control what's visible in each viewport. First, use the MSPACE command to enable a
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viewport; its outline will change, and the drawing cursor (crosshairs) will be active in only the "current" viewport. Viewports may be selected by clicking inside of any viewport border; typing CTRL-R will move from one viewport to the next sequentially. Once a viewport is selected and active, use the VPLAYER command (Freeze and Thaw options) to enable just the layers to be visible in that viewport. VPLAYER will accept wildcard characters; VPLAYER F[reeze] * will freeze (make invisible) all layers, while VPLAYER T[haw] * will make all layers visible in the current viewport. The VPLAYER command behaves essentially like the LAYER command, except that it affects only selected viewports. Step 6 - Set Viewport Scale Factor(s) - The ZOOM command has a special scale format for use with Paper Space viewports. To scale the contents of a viewport to the desired plot scale, type ZOOM, and then the Scale Factor followed by the letters "XP." For example, to set the scale of the current viewport to plot at 1:100 (or 1' = 100'), the command sequence is ZOOM 1/100XP (ZOOM 0.01XP works, too, but usually a rational fraction is easier to remember). Step 7 - Arrange the View in the Viewport - With the viewport still current, the PAN command may be used to move the visible objects to the desired location in the viewport. If the viewport is too large or too small for the objects (or portions of objects) to eventually appear in the viewport, that will be taken care of in the next step; for now, just PAN the view to an appropriate relationship with one corner (say, upper left) of the viewport. The DVIEW TWIST command may be used to rotate the view if needed. Each viewport will "remember" its zoom scale and rotation, independently from other viewports. Step 8 - Set Viewport Size - Viewport borders may be moved and stretched to make the viewport exactly contain the desired Model Space objects. First, use the PSPACE command to return to Paper Space (the cursor is now active over the entire drawing area). Next, use the STRETCH command to size the viewport; unlike other objects, you need only select one corner of a viewport with the crossing box to begin stretching.
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  • Fall '12
  • ToddDavidson
  • Scale factor, Scale model, Model Space, paper space

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