He acknowledges that it will take time and work on

This preview shows page 4 - 7 out of 7 pages.

the country was facing now. He acknowledges that it will take time and work on all sides but that this is the history of American, stating, “Our journey has never been one of short-cuts or settling- for-less. It has not been the path for the faint-hearted — for those who prefer leisure over work, or seek only the pleasures of riches and fame. Rather, it has been the risk-takers, the doers, the makers of things — some celebrated but more often men and women obscure in their labor, who have carried us up the long, rugged path towards prosperity and freedom.” He claims that it will take everyone, being kind and thoughtful and helpful to succeed in what lies ahead for them. He supports this by citing different kindnesses Americans are known for showing others when the times get rough. “It is the kindness to take in a stranger when the levees break , the selflessness of workers who would rather cut their hours than see a friend lose their job which sees us through our darkest hours. It is the firefighter's courage to storm a stairway filled with smoke , but also a parent's willingness to nurture a child , that finally decides our fate.” Secondly the President elect took the opportunity to use this speech as a way to show support to the Muslim community as an attempt to sway away from the negative outlook the citizens of the United States had become accustomed to seeing since the attacks on 9/11. An article titled The Socio Pragmatic Functions of Inaugural Speech: A Critical Discourse Analysis Approach, “ Obama as a new president fabricates a new scenario in which the role of Muslims as evil people has greatly been changed to the people who deserve to be included in the in-group
and even counted as the members of the super American society. This strategy is justifiable because Obama's intention is to relieve the tension existing between the Muslims and the Western world.” He also was able to address those who may be viewing internationally by mentioning a vast majority of religions in his speech. As D. A. Frank states in his writing in Obama's Rhetorical Signature: Cosmopolitan Civil Religion in the Presidential Inaugural Address , “The address reflected Obama's construction of his national and international audience, and assumed the integrity of both religious and scientific methods. "Americans are a religious people. 90 percent of us believe in God," Obama had declared in his "Call to Renewal" speech during the campaign, suggesting to liberals and progressives that it is a "mistake" to overlook the "power of faith in people's lives," and arguing it was time to "reconcile faith with our modern, pluralistic democracy." Mr. Obama’s speech covered many specifics and areas that the American people hoped to hear mentioned and was received well by the large majority.
Works Cited Biria, R., & Mohammadi, A. (2010;2012;). The socio pragmatic functions of inaugural speech: A critical discourse analysis approach. Journal of Pragmatics: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Language Studies, 44 (10), 1290-1302. doi:10.1016/j.pragma.2012.05.013 Frank, D. A. (2011). Obama's Rhetorical Signature: Cosmopolitan Civil Religion in the Presidential Inaugural Address, January 20, 2009. Rhetoric & Public Affairs 14(4), 605- 630. Michigan State University Press. Retrieved September 24, 2017, from Project

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture