Another positive impact of participation in

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Another positive impact of participation in extracurricular activities is the possibility of a student acquiring some type of supportive relationship, mentor or role model with an adult. When children identify with a helpful coach or talented director, the children get to know them better by being involved. Students have the opportunity to have genuine interaction, constructive feedback and support from an adult role model while developing positive relationships outside of their immediate families. This type of participation may help to develop mutual trust, respect and commitment in relationships (cited in Smith at el., Feldman & Mat jasko, 2005). Most students benefit from supporting and caring relationships with teachers and other adults. The presence of "other adult relationships" is recognized as a developmental asset linked to facilitating academic and life success (Logan & Scarborough 2008). POTENTIAL NEGATIVE EFFECT OF PARTICIPATION When considering how extracurricular activities impact students, mention should be made regarding potential negative impact of participation in out-of-school activities. Reeves (2008) determined that parents and teachers might fear students may lose their focus on academics when they become too busy with out-of-school activities. Attending too many rehearsals, practices, and meetings may cut into homework time. When students get overscheduled, they might be spreading themselves too thin, which may lead to spending less time studying and preparing for class.
Another down side to participation might occur when the parents push their children to be involved in nearly every activity available. Using activities to provide day-care is not recommended, yet some parents schedule their child in piano lessons, soccer, youth group, scouts and dance class so there is an activity each night of the week. This may not only impact the child's academic success, but may even effect the dedication shown to each activity as the child may not be there by choice. Thompson (2008) further discussed this concept when stating "The level of commitment is much more important than the specific activity" (p.l0). Not only can over-scheduling impact academics and level of commitment, it can also impact the student emotionally and physically which could lead to stress, fatigue and bum-out. Parents can be part of the problem if they push their children to be involved in too many activities or by forcing children to participate when they do not want to be involved. This can lead students to be afraid to quit for fear of disappointing the parent, or the other extreme of students quitting everything in defiance of the controlling parent. Balance in activities of the adolescent's choice is recommended. Gilman (2004) found that those who participated in athletics were almost twice as likely to remain in school as students who did not participate; however, it was also determined that participation in sports teams corresponded with greater rates of alcohol consumption and illicit drug use. It needs to be noted that these outcomes can

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