Then ill bring up photoshops refine edge command

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Then, I’ll bring up Photoshop’s Refine Edge command either by going up to the Select menu in the Menu Bar along the top of the screen and choosing Refine Edge from the menu choices, or, since I still have the Polygonal Lasso Tool selected, I can simply click on the Refine Edge button in the Options Bar (you need to have a selection tool active for the Refine Edge button to appear in the Options Bar):
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Clicking on the Refine Edge button in the Options Bar (with a selection tool active). This opens the Refine Edge dialog box, but before we look at it, let’s take a quick look at my image in the document window where we see that the area I selected is now sitting in front of a solid white background: The document window showing the selection in front of a white background. The View Options You may actually be seeing something different with your image. Your selection may be appearing in front of a white background as mine is, or it may be in front of a solid black background. Or, you may still be seeing the standard “marching ants” selection outline, or several other possible views. It all depends on which View Mode is currently selected at the top of the Refine Edge dialog box. You can see a small thumbnail preview of the current view mode to the right of the word "View": A small preview thumbnail shows the current view mode. If you click either on the thumbnail or on the small arrow to the right of the thumbnail, you’ll open a list of the different view modes you can choose from. I currently have the On White mode chosen, which is why my selection is appearing against a white background. I’ll choose the On Black view mode directly above it:
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Choosing the On Black view mode from the list. And now my selection appears against a solid black background: The selection now appears against black after choosing the On Black view mode. If I select the Black & White view mode from the list:
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Choosing the Black & White view mode. The image in the document window appears as if I was looking at a layer mask . White represents the area that’s currently selected, while black represents the area not currently selected. Any gray in the image would represent partially selected areas: The Black & White view mode shows the image as it would appear as a layer mask. Finally, I’ll select the On Layers view mode: Choosing the On Layers view mode from the list. This mode shows the current selection as it actually appears in front of the other layer(s) in the document, which can be very useful when compositing images since it makes it easy to judge the result. In my case, since I have a second photo on a layer below the main image, we can see the second photo behind my selection. If you’re working on a single-layer document with no other layers below your photo, the non-selected area will be filled with a checkerboard pattern which is Photoshop’s way of representing transparency:
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The image with the On Layers view mode selected.
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