5 if one server can help 35 customers per hour and a

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Strategic Management: Theory & Cases: An Integrated Approach
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 1
Strategic Management: Theory & Cases: An Integrated Approach
Hill/Schilling
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5. If one server can help 35 customers per hour and a new customer arrives every 4 minutes, then what percentage of the time would the server be busy? A. 11.4% B. 88.6% C. 57.2% D. 42.8% E. 8.75%
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Strategic Management: Theory & Cases: An Integrated Approach
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Chapter 11 / Exercise 1
Strategic Management: Theory & Cases: An Integrated Approach
Hill/Schilling
Expert Verified
SCM 300 – MODULE 06 Study Packet Answer Key: 1.A 2.C 3.C 4.B 5.D Module 06: SCM Integration Reading Assignments - e-Notes (Supply Chain Management Fundamentals: Module 6) Below is a list of the items most likely to be tested from the Module 6 eNotes: Recap of supply chain basics Focus on people Competitive priorities Measuring success Maximize value productivity Eight supply chain processes Product development and commercialization Supplier relationship management Manufacturing flow management Demand management Order fulfillment Customer relationship management Customer service management Returns management Shrinkage calculation: Order Size Required = (Actual Demand) / (Proportion of Acceptable Product per Order) Square root rule (and calculation) – Risk Pooling Inv Future = Inv Present [ (SqRt WH Future) / (SqRt WH Present) Inv Future: Total combined Inventory need in future Inv Present: Total combined Inventory in present system SqRt WH Future: Square Root of total number of future warehouses SqRt WH Present: Square Root of total number of present warehouses Importance of supply chain integration: integration is the bringing together of groups that were separated in the hopes of seeing improvements. In supply chain, it’s the bringing together of supply chain partners Obstacles to Integration: all related to poor communication, an unwillingness to share, and/or lack of trust between supply chain Bullwhip effect: a supply chain phenomenon where fairly stable demand results in a proliferation in the amount of inventory that is carried as one travels upstream in the supply chain 4 Causes of the bullwhip effect Order Batching: when companies place large and infrequent orders from their suppliers Forward Buying: the result of suppliers offering sales Rationing: when suppliers do not have enough inventory to satisfy the demand of all their customers Shortage Gaming: When customers will place a large order to anticipate rationing 5 Methods for controlling the bullwhip effect Every day low pricing: Suppliers resist the urge to have sales promotions and instead offer their lowest and most competitive prices each day Vendor Management Inventory systems: systems where buyers share inventory information with suppliers, and suppliers in turn take on the responsibility of managing inventory levels for the buyer y placing, delivering, and sometimes even stock the buyers shelves Information sharing between supply chain partners
SCM 300 – MODULE 06 Study Packet Develop strong buyer-supplier relationships that result in the sharing of supply chain responsibilities and even strategy and planning Practicing lean manufacturing across the supply chain Push system and Push system characteristics A system in which consumer demand is known and expected. Dinner example: Ribs, mashed potatoes and

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