Goodman brown was aware that the man he met in the

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 5 pages.

Goodman Brown was aware that the man he met in the forest, filled the qualifications of the Devil. Yet, he still followed his directions and ended up trusting the old man that he had never met before. He bestowed his faith in the Devil, and lost his faith in God and his family history, as they never ventured as far into darkness as Goodman Brown just did.
Ogawa 4 The next morning, Brown returns home and the narrator makes it known that maybe what happened last night was a dream rather than a reality. When Brown returns home believing he has rejected the devil, but in fact he did not. Instead, he becomes a bitter, fearful man, who becomes suspicious of everyone around him. The moral of the story is that a person’s faith can hold them together, and losing faith in anything can change someone’s life forever. The narrator illustrates that one someone leaves the path of righteousness and faith, it is hard to find it again even if we want to, because that mysterious forest that tested our faith is full of darkens and sin. Ultimately, it isn't clear whether Young Goodman Brown's nighttime adventure in the forest was a dream or a real event. Nevertheless, it effectively destroys Brown's belief in the goodness of human nature. If he kept the faith that he had in his family history and in God, he would have known not to trust the old man that turns out to be the Devil. If he kept the faith that he had in his wife Faith, he would have not gone into the forest. Faith is an important thing to maintain, because Goodman Brown becomes a different person after he loses his faith in the story.
Ogawa 5 Works Cited "faith." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, 2016. Web. 28 February 2016. Kelly, Joseph, ed. The Seagull Reader: Literature. 3rd ed. New York: Norton, 2015. Print.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture