parole the State of Oklahoma in 2000 sought a death penalty conviction on 161

Parole the state of oklahoma in 2000 sought a death

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parole, the State of Oklahoma in 2000 sought a death-penalty conviction on 161 counts of first- degree murder (160 non-federal agent victims and one fetus). [177] On May 26, 2004 the jury found him guilty on all charges, but deadlocked on the issue of sentencing him to death. Presiding Judge Steven W. Taylor then determined the sentence of 161 consecutive life terms without the possibility of parole. [178] In March 2005, FBI investigators, acting on a tip, searched a buried crawl space in Nichols' former house and found additional explosives missed in the preliminary search after Nichols was arrested. [179] In 2009 Nichols was being held in the ADX Florence Federal Prison. [180] [ edit ] Michael Fortier Main article: Michael and Lori Fortier Michael and Lori Fortier were considered accomplices for their foreknowledge of the planning of the bombing. In addition to Michael assisting McVeigh in scouting the federal building, Lori had helped McVeigh laminate a fake driver's license which was later used to rent the Ryder truck. [44] Michael agreed to testify against McVeigh and Nichols in exchange for a reduced sentence and immunity for his wife. [181] He was sentenced on May 27, 1998 to twelve years in prison and fined $75,000 for failing to warn authorities about the attack. [182] On January 20, 2006, after
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serving ten and a half years of his sentence, including time already served, Fortier was released for good behavior into the Witness Protection Program and given a new identity. [183] [ edit ] Others No "John Doe #2" was ever identified, nothing conclusive was ever reported regarding the owner of the unmatched leg, and the government never openly investigated anyone else in conjunction with the bombing. Although the defense teams in both McVeigh's and Nichols trials suggested that others were involved, Judge Steven W. Taylor found no credible, relevant, or legally admissible evidence, of anyone other than McVeigh and Nichols having directly participated in the bombing. [160] When McVeigh was asked if there were other conspirators in the bombing, he replied: "Because the truth is, I blew up the Murrah Building, and isn't it kind of scary that one man could wreak this kind of hell?" [184] On the morning of McVeigh's execution a letter was released in which he had written "For those die-hard conspiracy theorists who will refuse to believe this, I turn the tables and say: Show me where I needed anyone else. Financing? Logistics? Specialized tech skills? Brainpower? Strategy? ... Show me where I needed a dark, mysterious 'Mr. X'!" [185] [ edit ] Aftermath Its survival of the bombing made The Survivor Tree elm an emblem of the memorial. A smaller tree is visible in the foreground. Main articles: Terrorism in the United States and Domestic terrorism in the United States The Oklahoma City bombing was the deadliest act of terrorism against the United States on American soil until the September 11 attacks six years later. [186] It has been estimated that about 387,000 people in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area (a third of the population) knew someone who was directly affected by the bombing. [128] [187] [188]
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