g using such terms as good long and indicates the quality of performance

G using such terms as good long and indicates the

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in nature (e.g., using such terms as good, long), and indicates the quality of performance. Performance bandwidth - in the context of providing augmented feedback, a range of acceptable performance error; augmented feedback is given only when the amount of error is greater than this range. Descriptive KP - a verbal knowledge of performance (KP) statement that describes only the error a person has made during the performance of a skill. Prescriptive KP - a verbal knowledge of performance (KP) statement that describes errors made during the performance of a skill and states (i.e., prescribes) what needs to be done to correct them. Biofeedback - a type of augmented feedback that provides information about physiological processes through the use of instrumentation (e.g., EMG biofeedback). Concurrent augmented feedback - augmented feedback that is provided while a
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person is performing a skill or making a movement.
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Terminal augmented feedback - augmented feedback that is provided after a person has completed the performance of a skill or a movement. KR-delay interval - the interval of time between the completion of a movement and the presentation of augmented feedback. Post-KR interval - the interval of time between the presentation of augmented feedback and the beginning of the next trial. Guidance hypothesis - a hypothesis indicating that the role of augmented feedback in learning is to guide performance to be correct during practice; however, if it is provided too frequently, it can cause the learner to develop a dependency on its availability and therefore to perform poorly when it is not available. Chapter 16 Practice variability - the variety of movement and context characteristics a person experiences while practicing a skill. Contextual interference - the memory and performance disruption (i.e., interference) that results from performing multiple skills or variations of a skill within the context of practice. Contextual interference effect - the learning benefit resulting from performing multiple skills in a high contextual interference practice schedule (e.g., random practice), rather than performing the skills in a low contextual interference schedule (e.g., blocked practice). Specificity of practice hypothesis - the view that motor skill learning by practice condition characteristics, especially the sensory/perceptual information available, performance context characteristics, and cognitive processes involved. Chapter 17 Overlearning - practice that continues beyond the amount needed to achieve a certain performance criterion. Massed practice - a practice schedule in which the amount of rest between practice sessions or trials is very short. Distributed practice - a practice schedule in which the amount of rest between practice sessions or trials is relatively long.
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