this hypothesis is also consistent with the possibility that the word is trap

This hypothesis is also consistent with the

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. this hypothesis is also consistent with the possibility that the word is trap, but inconsistent with the possibility that the word is able. If the first letter is taken to be a tthat will facilitate the hypothesis that the word is trap, but inhibit the hypothesis that the word is able. The hypothesis that the word is trapwill in turn facilitate the perception that the second letter is r, while inhibiting the perception that the second letter is b. Excitatory and inhibitory connections between units determine what you end up seeing.Colors in ContextColor vision is another domain in which context can have an impact on what you see. The perception of color is influenced by the perceptual context in which an object appears. (cube example- yellow and blue). perception of color is determined both by the wavelength of light coming into the eye and by the context in which an objectappears. -To explain color illusions such as this, Purves and Lottodeveloped a theory of the context effect on color perception that they call an empirical theory of color vision(our perception of color depends on our prior experience with how objects look when they are viewed among different objects and under various lighting conditions.Cross-Modal Context Shams, Kamitani, and Shimojopoint to a familiar real-world example of cross-modal context effects on perception, namely ventriloquism. Anyone who has seen a good ventriloquist will surely agree that the voice that originates from the mouth of the human performer appears to come from the mouth of his or her puppet. Here we perceive something different from what actually is because of our prior expectations: weexpect voices to come from moving mouths and so we attribute the voice to the wrong visual source. in this case the context is visual (movement of the mouth) but the stimulus affected by the context is auditory. -McGurk effect(the auditory experience of syllable ‘’da’’ when seeing a mouth silently saying ‘’ga’’ while at the same time hearing a voice say ‘’ba’’) is another example of how context affects perception. The Grand Illusion What if, instead of having a true and accurate visual representation of the world, we were actually processing only fragments of our visual field and representing only one or at more two objects in detail at a time? ,
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Color card trick! perception is an illusion! - Info is lost as it is processed in the visual system We use shortcuts/assumptions to perceive This is what makes us susceptible to visual illusions The illusions we are susceptible to illustrate our heuristics: assumptions about regularities in the world that we bring to perception Ex: - illusions related to depth cues. Ex: monster close and far - The “world is lit from above illusion’ (pic of shell: covew or concave? - The Ebbinghaus illusion The two orange circles are the same size Perceptual processes in our brain makes judgements about size using adjacent objects (ie: the context it is presented in) Important: - Attention limits severly what we see. Ex: change blindness experiment -
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