The process evaluates the items in stopping the

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product to stop it from perpetually fading away from the market. The process evaluates the items in stopping the process of brewing beer. The beer will no longer be considered current. The phase-out process has a few steps that are critical for a successful transition. The first step is the planning phase. The withdrawal of Anheuser-Busch beer could have potentially major issues for distributors or retail locations. Anheuser-Busch will store items some of the remaining beer for a period of time because if there are any contamination issues Anheuser-Busch has test samples to find a cause. To actually eliminate the beer, there needs to be a framework in place to help the process thru to completion. Anheuser-Busch will take on any possible risks with this process to actually remove the beer from production. The most important factor of this step is planning to make sure all bases are covered. The second step is actually phasing out the beer. This step can actually cover a long period of time. Distributors are notified the beer is going to end-of-life. A product goes end-of-life about 1 year in advance. Within this step, sales must send a clear message of the product ending life, marketing needs to withdraw marketing material from the website and product category manufacturing will not maintenance the equipment, and inventory all components and inventory and systems must be updated with the correct status. The last step is follow up. A retrospective analysis of what was learned in this process is completed. This
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Life Cycle Management 9 analysis can be reviewed at any period after product end-of-life but it should not be done within 1 month because there needs to be additional data obtained from surveys and feedback.
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Life Cycle Management 10 References Investopedia. (n.d.). Product Life Cycle . Retrieved from Investopedia: Levitt, T. (n.d.). Exploit the Product Life Cycle . Retrieved from Harvard Business Review: Product Life Cycle . (n.d.). Retrieved from Inc: Stevenson, W. J. (2018). Operations Management,. New York: McGraw Hill. Stone Brewery. (n.d.). Supply Chain Management . Retrieved from Stone Brewery: Taylor, E. (n.d.). Differences in Supply Chain Designs for a Manufacturing Industry vs. a Service Industry . Retrieved from Chron: - manufacturing-industry-vs-service-industry-14610.html
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