neurotic lassitude engendered by meeting ones past at every turn around ev ery

Neurotic lassitude engendered by meeting ones past at

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neurotic lassitude engendered by meeting one’s past at every turn, around ev- ery corner, inside every cupboard, I go aimlessly from room to room,” and then finally to “she is an open and trusting child, unprepared for and unaccustomed to the ambushes of family life”, Didion complicates her exploration of “the bur- den of home” step by step. First, “the burden of home” is “some nameless anxiety”, then “a very real part of the sentimental and largely literary baggage”, then “the neurotic lassi- tude” caused by recalling one’s past, then finally points out that it is “the am- bushes of family life”, or in other words, the nameless struggle of family life. Zone 7 Tension: “I had by all objective accounts a ‘normal’ and a ‘happy’ family situation, and yet I was almost thirty years old before I could talk to my family on the telephone without crying after I had hung up. We did not fight. Nothing was wrong.” This paragraph surprises me a lot because there seems to be a paradox inside: a normal and happy without anything wrong or fighting makes the au- thor cry every time she talks to her family on the phone. Zone 8 Reflection: What does the author want to imply in the last paragraph of the whole text? Is that a response to what she mentioned before that “sometimes, I think that
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those of us who are now in our thirties were born into the last generation to carry the burden ‘home,’ to find in family life the source of all tension and drama”?
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  • Fall '11
  • Parmiter
  • Writing, Stepfamily, The Saturday Evening Post, 9.0: Live, Joah Didion, largely literary baggage

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