The biological reasoning behind our data is that a

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The biological reasoning behind our data is that a falling sensation activates fight or flight response, increasing adrenaline and resulting in an increase of systolic blood pressure. It is possible that emotional duress before the actual fall could also increase blood pressure because the emotional state would be enough to activate the SNS. This hypothesis is supported by a study conducted by Weber, C.S. et al., which concluded that emotional irritation would increase blood pressure and noradrenaline levels.
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Marla Waters BI 212 There were several limitations in the experimental design and questions that were not addressed by our study. For instance, the vertical tilt induced by the “trust fall” could impact the blood pressure on its own. By changing the angle of the body, the blood pressure may or may not change. The way to determine if this would impact our study would be to take the blood pressure of a subject sitting, and compare it to their blood pressure while lying down. To better improve our study we could have also recorded the pulse before and after activity and incorporated that into our data as well. Additionally, our sample only included forty-one individuals, all of college-age, which impacts how generalizable our results may be. Future research should focus on whether emotional stress alone would impact blood pressure. The experiment could include preparing a subject for a trust fall and not actually performing one. A change in blood pressure would mean that the anticipation of free falling would heighten fight or flight response. Works Cited Carrier, Mark (2013): “General Biology II Organisms: Course Packet.” University of Oregon. Spring 2013 Carrier, Mark (2013): “General Biology II Organisms: Lectures.” University of Oregon. Spring 2013 Struthers, A.D. and J.L Reid and R Whitesmith, and J.C. Rodger (1983): “Effect of Intravenous Adrenaline on Electrodiogram, Blood Pressure, and Serum Potassium.” Br Heart J . Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 90-93
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Marla Waters BI 212 Weber, C.S., J.F. Thayer, M. Rudat, F.H. Perschel, K. Buchholz and H.C. Deter (2007). “Emotional irritation before mental stress is associated with enhanced peripheral norepinephrine.” Scandinavian Journal of Psychology . Vol 48. pp. 459-466.
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