Disagreed just because we experience spatial imagery doesnt mean that

Disagreed just because we experience spatial imagery

This preview shows page 49 - 52 out of 75 pages.

Disagreed- just because we experience spatial imagery doesn’t mean that underlying representation is spatial Epiphenomenon- accompanies a mechanism but isn’t actually part of it Propositional representations- relationships are represented by symbols Depictive representations- correspond to spatial representation; because spatial representation can be depicted by a picture o Comparing imagery and perception Size in the visual field Kosslyn (1978) o Participants imagine two animals next to each other and close enough that large one was taking up most of visual field o Asked questions about smaller animal and answered as quickly as possible o Mental walk task- participants asked to form mental image of object and to imagine they’re walking towards it Interactions of imagery and perception o If imagery affects perception (vice versa), both have access to the same mechanisms. o Perky (1910) Project visual images of object onto a screen and describe them Perky back-projects dim images onto a screen in front of participant Images described were exactly like images projected Participants mistook actual picture for mental image o Farah (1985) Imagine letter H or T on screen
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Participants indicate whether letter was in first square or second Target letter detected more accurately when participant imagined same letter Imagery and the brain o Imagery neurons in the brain Kreiman et al. (2000) Study patients with electrodes implanted in medial temporal lobe (hippocampus, amygdala) Neurons respond to some objects but not others Imagery neuron- fire in the same way when a person sees a picture of an object and when a person creates a visual image of that object o Brain imaging Le Bihan et al. (1993) Perception and imagery activate the visual cortex Asking participants to think about questions involving imagery generated greater response in visual cortex than nonimagery questions Kosslyn et al. (1995) Topographic map- specific locations on a visual stimulus cause activity at specific locations in the visual cortex, and points next to each other on the stimulus cause activity at locations next to each other on the cortex Participants create small, medium, and large mental images in brain scanner Small image- activity near back of brain As size of image increases, activation moved toward the front of visual cortex Ganis et al. (2004) Used fMRI to measure activation under perception and imagery Perception- participants observed drawing of object Imagery- participants told to imagine picture they studied before when they heard tone Perception and imagery activate same areas in frontal lobe Amedi et al. (2005) Showed overlap but when participants used visual imagery, response of some areas associated with non visual stimuli was decreased o Multivoxel pattern analysis Johnson and Johnson (2014)
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Study relation between imagery and perception by training a classifier by presenting 4 diff. kinds of scenes to person in scanner Voxel activity recorded as participant viewed picture Classifier predicted correct picture on 63% of trials
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