Previously mentioned is just trying to find a place

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previously mentioned, is just trying to find a place to call home where she is finally treated the way she knows she deserves. While the audience might feel disgusted in the beginning of the play by the way these women are using their body, a whole new light is shown on them by the end of the play. Mama puts it best in scene 4 of act II when she says “You men kill me. You come in here, drink your beer, take your pleasure, and then wanna judge the way I run my ‘business.’ The front door swings both ways” (57). Mama goes on to explain how yes, she may not make all the right choices and the things that these girls have to do may not be right or fair, but when the men do things just as bad, particularly to these women, they are not looked upon or judged poorly. The audience can find this to be true because in the beginning all one can thing about is how awful these women are but in reality both are making wrong choices, and the men in many cases, are acting far worse. From one perspective, this stereotype puts men in a bad light because it shows that this society expects this from them so it is not shocking when it happens. It also however, condones the bad actions of these gruesome men. This is not a subject that only comes about in a third world country like the Congo however; this topic is well discussed lately by people in America. Many say that the women who are raped in the US are looking for it by the way the dress and the way they act. No woman though, goes to pick her outfit thinking beforehand, “What will entice men enough to rape me?” Yet somehow, the men are never to blame for what they do and how they treat other women. Even in a small aspect, like when a man and a woman are fighting, it’s always that the woman is too emotional and she is to blame for the fight. Lynn Nottage brings up this very important topic to the audience. Although the Congo is very far away from America, there is a deeply rooted
similarity in the treatment of women and although the story has a happy ending, many do not. So, how are we as an audience and as a collective group of people, going to change this stereotype and society so that women are finally treated properly? Work Cited Nottage, Lynn. Ruined: [a Play]. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 2009. Print.

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