The need more efficient multi lingual web publishing

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The Need: More Efficient Multi-lingual Web Publishing Efective content globalization requires striking the right balance between providing a satisfying customer experience in local languages and maintaining and enhancing corporate branding. HP has years of experience performing this balancing act, which is challenge enough for companies with just a handful of international web sites. Given its presence in 178 countries worldwide, the scale of HP’s globalization requirements is daunting. At HP, three primary sets of activities support the mechanics of global publishing: Regionalization is the process of adapting content to a geographic region. Translation is the process of transforming content from one language to another. Localization, as defined earlier, is the process of modifying content to account for diferences in distinct markets, with cultural sensitivities and legal requirements in mind.
An example illustrates how and where these processes fit together. HP needs to translate product content for a new all-in-one printer/scanner/fax device. One target language is French, for marketing in France and French-speaking Belgium. The HP business unit creates product content in English, which is the company’s official business language. That content is then regionalized by HP’s EMEA organization (Europe, Middle East, and Africa). The regionalized version is translated into French and, finally, localized separately for France and Belgium. In some cases, localization occurs before and/or after translation. In 1998, the core problem was not the need to establish globalization and localization processes, but that the established processes were not optimized operationally. This was not a situation unique to HP. Content localization, in particular, is an area rife with opportunities to save time and money. LISA estimates that 48% of outsourced localization expenditures is translation. 4. In many organizations, translation is still driven by inefficient manual processes, whether performed in-house or outsourced. Lack of proper upfront planning for downstream translation and localization means that content globalization can end up taking twice as long and costing twice as much as what would have been spent with planning. 5. Low levels of reuse drive up costs associated with redundant translations. Extensive use of outside vendors delays time to market and increases overhead costs. Inconsistencies in published information reduce customer satisfaction and increase the risk of diminished customer loyalty. Six years ago, HP faced these very issues. At the same time, HP was starting to rely more heavily on its websites as its primary means of communication with customers and partners. As Translation and Localization (T&L) Manager Alison Toon notes, “In a global operating envi- ronment, the Internet has become a primary interface between customer and vendor. And the customer expects to see consistent and timely information regardless of how and where it is published, whether on a website or in a printed brochure or manual.” In 1998, Toon started a

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