Wordsworth tries to describes the industrial

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this world. Wordsworth tries to describes the Industrial Revolution as the start of which means no longer cared for the simplicity of the world. The audience is specified as anyone who lives in “our” world. William Wordsworth created this sonnet resulting in becoming the voice of nature, because without the ones who speak for nature, it would not have any way of being exemplified for its needs, which leads to the purpose behind the stanzas and the reason why Wordsworth wrote this poem. The objective of the sonnet was to connect people during the era in which nature was a simple way to get money. William Wordsworth wished his audience to think about the beauty of the world. “This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up- gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for everything, weare out of tune”(5-8). The memo that Wordsworth is trying to convey is that nature is graceful and charming and without humanity regarding it in that way, they may not live to their full capacity.
William Wordsworth creates the subject that nature is too beautiful not to respect and the power nature has that can develop humanity. The sonnet addresses the subject within the first four lines, persuading humanity to change their ways. “Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; Little we see in Nature that is ours”(2-3). Humanity should be concerned about the earth

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