Thomas Paine from Philadelphia wrote a 50 page pamphlet called Common Sense

Thomas paine from philadelphia wrote a 50 page

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Thomas Paine from Philadelphia wrote a 50 page pamphlet called Common Sense that inspired many to change their minds. Paine stated that it was ridiculous to think that a tiny island could successfully rule a continent 3,000 miles away He further argued that the monarchy had grown corrupt and tyrannical while America had long been “the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty” Common Sense publicly urged independence for the very first time and urged colonists to not see breaking with England as a loss, but as a great opportunity to form a new republic By January of 1776, more than 120,000 copies had been published and many colonists began to reconsider their stand on independence. Other leaders like John Adams and Richard Henry Lee fought to convince members of the Continental Congress to support independence. By June of 1776 a committee was appointed to start drafting the Declaration of Independence
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THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE Unlike earlier colonial demands, this document did not demand the colonists rights as Englishmen, instead it claimed that certain rights are common to all mankind natural rights (based on Enlightenment ideas) The idea of natural rights comes from Enlightenment philosopher John Locke who argued that the job of the government was to protect its people’s natural rights to life, liberty and property. This idea is the foundation of the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration stated that “all men are created equal and endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights.” He then listed the ways in which the King had failed to protect those rights. -taxation without direct representation, establishment of military dictatorships, limitations on trade, etc July 4, 1776 the Second Continental Congress unanimously adopted the Declaration of Independence. Americans had officially renounced all allegiance to the British Crown and completely dissolve all political ties with Great Britain. The “13 United States of America” was officially revolting and declaring their independence.
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THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AMERICAN ODYSSEY CHAPTER 6 (AND A TINY BIT OF CH 5)
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GAINING SUPPORT FOR REVOLUTION Many colonists were torn on the issue of independence. They still thought of themselves as British. Thomas Paine from Philadelphia wrote a 50 page pamphlet called Common Sense that inspired many to change their minds. Paine stated that it was ridiculous to think that a tiny island could successfully rule a continent 3,000 miles away He further argued that the monarchy had grown corrupt and tyrannical while America had long been “the asylum for the persecuted lovers of civil and religious liberty” Common Sense publicly urged independence for the very first time and urged colonists to not see breaking with England as a loss, but as a great opportunity to form a new republic By January of 1776, more than 120,000 copies had been published and many colonists began to reconsider their stand on independence.
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  • Fall '17
  • bowers
  • Government, American Revolution, United States Declaration of Independence, Thirteen Colonies

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