Stage ivb the cancer has spread to distant organs

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Stage IVB: The cancer has spread to distant organs beyond the pelvic area, such as the lungs. 5-year survival rates by stage: Listed below are listed the chances a woman will live 5 years after treatment for the various stages of cervical cancer. These are overall survival figures, so they also include women who die of other causes. The numbers are approximate and come from women treated more than 10 years ago. Stage 5-year survival IA Above 95% IB1 Around 90% IB2 Around 80%-85% IIA/B Around 75%-78% IIIA/B Around 47%-50% IV Around 20%-30% DIFFERENTIALS Cervicitis Endometrial Carcinoma Pelvic Inflammatory Disease Uterine Cancer Vaginitis Managem,ent Treatment may involve cryosurgery, cauterization, conization, laser treatment or hysterectomy. Conization is the usual treatment for young women who wish to have children. Most women who do not want to have additional children are treated with total hysterectomy (removal of the
cervix and uterus.) Treatment for invasive cancer of the cervix depends on the extent of the disease. Patients whose cancer has invaded only the cervix and those whose disease has extended into the tissues next to the cervix or to the upper vagina can be treated effectively with either surgery or radiation therapy. Surgery may be a total hysterectomy or a radical hysterectomy (removal of the cervix, uterus, upper vagina and the lymph nodes in the area.) Both internal and external radiation therapy can be used to treat invasive cervical cancer. Patients with cancer that has spread to the pelvis, the lower part of the vagina or to the ureter are treated with radiation therapy alone. Again, both internal and external radiation therapy can be used. Patients with cervical cancer that has spread to the bladder, rectum or distant parts of the body, may receive chemotherapy in addition to surgery or radiation therapy. Chemotherapy also is used to treat patients whose disease recurs following treatment with surgery or radiation therapy. Lab Studies: A Papanicolaou test should be performed in every patient suggested to have a diagnosis of cervical cancer. Precancerous lesions of the cervix usually are detected via Papanicolaou test The patient should be referred to a gynecologist for colposcopy, direct biopsies, and endocervical curettage. After the diagnosis is established, a complete blood cell count and serum chemistry for renal and hepatic functions should be ordered to look for abnormalities from possible metastatic disease. Imaging Studies: Once the diagnosis is established, imaging studies are performed for staging purposes. A routine chest radiograph should be obtained to help rule out pulmonary metastasis. CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis is performed to look for metastasis in the liver, lymph nodes, or other organs and to help rule out hydronephrosis/hydroureter.

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