Remember that 1 ml 1 cm 3 4 calculate the density and

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Remember that 1 mL = 1 cm 3 4. Calculate the density and record it in the table. If you need a hint on how to do this, refer back to pg. 37. 5. Finally, infer the tectonic setting. Where would you expect to find the most dense rock? Where would you expect to find the least dense rock? Choose from the major divisions of the Earth: continental crust, oceanic crust, mantle, and core. Sample # Rock Name (identify) Mass (measure) Volume (measure) Density (calculate) Likely Tectonic Setting 4A 4B 4C TA CHECK ____________
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Lab #2: Igneous Rocks 42 Homework Activities Activity 1: Density Based on your results from your density measurements, answer the following questions. 1. Which type of igneous rock subducts at convergent boundaries? Please explain why. __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. In an oceanic-oceanic convergent boundary, which plate will subduct? Please explain why. __________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. The major compositional layers of the Earth are the core, the mantle, and the crust. a. Which layer is the most dense? Why?________________________________________________________ b. Which layer is the least dense? Why? ________________________________________________________ Activity 2: Google Earth The remainder of the homework questions will involve the use of Google Earth. Open up the program, then go to the Canvas page for your Geology 101 lab section and navigate to Modules 1 Lab 2. There you’ll find a series of Google Earth files. The files are named by the question to which they correspond in the homework questions below. Need a Google Earth refresher? Go to page 7. 1. Sierra Nevada Batholith. Batholith is the term for the largest class of igneous intrusion, and the Sierra Nevada batholith forms the core of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California and Nevada. There are exposures of granite in places like Yosemite National Park. a. Open the Lab2_1a_SierraNevadaBatholith.kmz file. This file will place a red polygon outlining the batho - lith. Use the transparency slider at the bottom of the Places panel to help get oriented. To get a sense for the size of this intrusion, measure length in kilometers. ______________km b. Open the Lab2_1b_HalfDome.kmz file (be sure to turn off the batholith layer from 1a). This will take you to the Half Dome at Yosemite National Park, which was carved by glacial ice flowing over the granite batholith. In meters , measure the minimum thickness of the batholith by determining the difference in elevation between the top of Half Dome and the floor of the valley. Note : If you can’t see the lat/long/elevation, go to the View menu and make sure the Status Bar is checked. ________________m
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Lab #2: Igneous Rocks 43 2. Tectonic Associations with Igneous Rocks For each of the following questions, open the Google Earth placemark with the same question number. The files for this activity are located on the lab Canvas page under Modules 1 Lab 2. Hint : Are you on continental crust? Oceanic crust? Refer to the in-class activities for help.
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