Determine the minimum maximum and mV for the depolarization events in this run

Determine the minimum maximum and mv for the

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11.Determine the minimum, maximum, and ∆mV for the depolarization events in this run. a.Tap and drag across the EMG graph to select the first area of increased amplitude (depolarization) in this run (see Figure 8).b.Choose Zoom In from the Graph menu and ensure that you have selected an area of data that represents the first area of increased amplitude (depolarization).c.Choose Statistics Potential from the Analyze menu.d.Record the minimum and maximum for this depolarization in Table 3, rounding to the nearest 0.01 mV.e.Determine and record the ∆mV value (amplitude).f.Choose Statistics from the Analyze menu to turn off statistics.12.Repeat this process for each of five unreinforced and five reinforceddepolarization events, using the Accelerometer to identify each primary reflex. Ignore rebound responses. Record the appropriate values in Table 3.14.Determine the average amplitude of the reinforcedand unreinforceddepolarization events examined. Record these values in Table 3. Figure 8 Figure 7
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14A - 6 Human Physiology with Vernier Experiment 14A DATA Table 1 Kick 1 Kick 2 Kick 3 Kick 4 Kick 5 Average Time of muscle contraction (s) Time of stimulus (s) t (s) Table 2 Reflex 1 Reflex 2 Reflex 3 Reflex 4 Reflex 5 Average Time of muscle contraction (s) Time of stimulus (s) t (s) Table 3 Reflex without reinforcement Reflex with reinforcement Reflex response Max (mV) Min (mV) mV Max (mV) Min (mV) mV 1 2 3 4 5 Average values
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Human Physiology with Vernier 14A - 7 Neuromuscular Reflexes DATA ANALYSIS 1.Compare the reaction times for voluntary vs. involuntary activation of the quadriceps muscle. What might account for the observed differences in reaction times?2.Using data from Table 2, calculate speed atwhich a stimulus traveled from the patellartendon to the spinal cord and back to thequadriceps muscle (a complete reflex arc).To do this, you must estimate the distancetraveled. Using a cloth tape measure thedistance in cm from the mark on the patellartendon to the spinal cord at waist level(straight across from the anterior-superioriliac spine–see Figure 9). Multiply thedistance by two to obtain the total distancetraveled in the reflex arc. Once this value hasbeen obtained, divide by the average ∆t fromTable 2 and divide by 100 to obtain thespeed, in m/s, at which the stimulus traveled.Note: since you probably didn’t measurethis before you left lab, just use 87.5 cm.3.Nerve impulses have been found to travel as fast as 100 m/s. What could account for the difference between your answer to Question 2 and this value obtained by researchers? 4.Assume the speed of a nerve impulse is 100 m/s. How does this compare to the speed of electricity in a copper wire (approx. 3.00 108m/s)? 5.Compare the average Δ mV of the reflex without reinforcement to the average Δ mV of the reflex with reinforcement. Which is greater and why?Figure 9
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