DSST Business Ethics Study Guide sm

8 bloodborne pathogens bbp 6 in 1990 osha issued a

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8. Bloodborne Pathogens (BBP [6] )- In 1990, OSHA issued a standard designed to prevent health care (and other) workers from being exposed to bloodborne pathogens such as hepatitis B and HIV. 9. Excavations and Trenches - OSHA regulations [7] specify that trenches and excavations wherein workers are working 5 feet or more down must be provided with safeguards in addition to proper sloping and storage of excavated material in order to prevet collapses/cave-ins. [8] 10. Exposure to asbestos - OSHA has established requirements in 29 CFR 1910.1001 for occupational exposure to asbestos. These requirements apply to most workplaces - most notably excepted is construction work. "Construction work" means work for construction, alteration and/or repair including painting and decorating. Occupational exposure requirements for asbestos in construction work can be found in 29 CFR 1926.1101. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ( EPA or sometimes USEPA ) is an agency of the federal government of the United States charged to protect human health and the environment, by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress. The EPA was proposed by President Richard Nixon and began operation on December 2, 1970, when its establishment was passed by Congress, and signed into law by President Nixon, and has since been chiefly responsible for the environmental policy of the United States. [2] It is led by its Administrator, who is appointed by the President of the United States. The EPA is not a Cabinetagency, but the Administrator is normally given cabinet rank. Lisa P. Jackson is the current Administrator. The agency has approximately 18,000 full-time employees. [3] Overview EPA headquarters in Washington, D.C. The EPA employs 17,000 people in headquarters program offices, 10 regional offices, and 27 laboratories across the country. More than half of its staff are engineers, scientists, and environmental protection specialists; other groups include legal, public affairs, financial, and computer specialists.
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The agency conducts environmental assessment, research, and education. It has the primary responsibility for setting and enforcing national standards under a variety of environmental laws, in consultation with state, tribal, and local governments. It delegates some permitting, monitoring, and enforcement responsibility to U.S. states and Native American tribes. EPA enforcement powers include fines, sanctions, and other measures. The agency also works with industries and all levels of government in a wide variety of voluntary pollution prevention programs and energy conservation efforts. Responsibilities of the EPA The Environmental Protection Agency is responsible for preventing, detecting, and enforcing environmental crimes, informing the public about environmental enforcement, and setting and monitoring standards of air pollution, water pollution, hazardous waste, and hazardous chemicals. While this agency aids in preventing and identifying hazardous situations, it is hard to
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8 Bloodborne Pathogens BBP 6 In 1990 OSHA issued a standard...

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