Goals should reinforcebe consistent with your mission values beliefs overall

Goals should reinforcebe consistent with your mission

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Goals should reinforce/be consistent with your mission, values, beliefs, overall strategy o In org settings, where possible, rewards should be tied to goals (remember that $ is not the only option here) Time Deadline o short-term not just long term Urgent Vs. Important Not every critical goal is urgent and not every urgent goal is critical o Most critical goals are long-term and not momentarily urgent Anyone want to share examples? o Weekly, make a list of urgent tasks – but also reconcile those with critical tasks Making Critical Goals Manageable o Break your critical goals down into manageable tasks o Prioritize those tasks o Put the tasks in correct sequential order (which may or may not be how you brainstormed them in the first place) – note which tasks follow a linear sequence and which have “lagging” relationship o For the high priority tasks, estimate how much of your time each task will take (add 20%) & give yourself a deadline What Is Motivation? The process of igniting, directing, and maintaining behavior toward a goal o Ignition = drive or energy behind our actions o Direction = What do we decide to do/how do we do it, out of all the possible choices?
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o Maintenance = Persistence in continuing to exert effort until a goal is met Note, though, that motivation is NOT the same as performance. Expectancy Theory Motivation is a function of three different types of beliefs people have: o 1. expectancy , or the belief that one’s effort will affect performance o 2. instrumentality – the belief that one’s performance will be rewarded (or punished), and o 3. valence – the perceived value of the expected rewards (or punishments). o This is more naturally a model of extrinsic motivation, but can be adapted to intrinsic motivation too Regulatory Focus Theory self-regulate: “promotion focus” (where the goal is to approach success) and “prevention focus” (where the goal is to avoid failure) Some individuals may be chronically higher in one over the other Situations/environments (including professions or organizations… or even more macroeconomic conditions) might influence us to move into one motivational frame or the other Prevention Focus o Avoidance mode – to try to minimize instances of negative outcomes/mistakes/failures/pain o Focus is on “ought” self – what one ought to do & one’s responsibilities o Outcomes are framed as “non-losses” or “losses” o When goals are achieved, feelings experienced are of relief or calmness o When goals are not achieved, feelings experienced are of anxiety, agitation o Prevention-focused people are more conservative/risk-averse (in attempt to prevent mistakes), but their work is also more thorough, more accurate, and more carefully planned.
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  • Fall '12
  • KyleEmich
  • reservation price, Making Eye Contact, potential external causes

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