According to charles warren a country cannot achieve

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with resources prevails. According to Charles Warren, a country cannot achieve neutrality by ignoring and isolation from war. In “Troubles of a Neutral”, he wrote that preparation for war is crucial as evidenced by World War I. President Wilson pledged his neutrality and expected to be able to continue trading and doing business with other countries. He did not prepare for any sort of scenario where America would be viewed as an enemy among these countries due to the pledge of neutrality. Therefore, when attacks on America was made during WW1, we were totally unprepared. Finally, Roosevelt realized that the Neutrality Act was a mistake and sent a message to Congress asking for it to be cancelled (Message to Congress Urging Repeal of the Embargo Provisions of the Neutrality Law, 21 September 1939). However, in order for Roosevelt to cancel the ban arrangements, he had to reverse them back to worldwide law as was the customary American approach. Shortly after, in 1936, Hitler abused the Versailles Treaty by rearming some portion of France, and he entered Austria. France and Great Britain met with Hitler in order to give him some action in Czechoslovakia as long as there was no further development there. But a few months later, Hitlerentered through Czechoslovakia and then he attacked Poland. This attack pushed Great Britain and France to declare war on Germany, which was the impetus of what we know as World War II. Roosevelt’s pleaded to redesign the Neutrality Acts and lift the Arms Embargo to pitch arms to the Allies. As the Nazi’s walk traversed over Europe and into France, Roosevelt asked Congress to set aside extra assets for the guard to shield the United States from potential Nazi attack. Roosevelt was re-elected and he initiated the Lend- Lease Actas a way to protect the United States. This provided military guides to outside countries during the war. In December
1941, the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor marked the formality of the United States joining the others as a World War II Ally.

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