about Winter Sundays as opposed to warm summer ones to further reiterate the

About winter sundays as opposed to warm summer ones

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about “Winter Sundays” as opposed to warm summer ones to further reiterate the sadness of the house and the distant coldness of his father’s relationship with him (Landau). Direct Quotation: “The poem is in open form with no rhyme scheme. It consists of four sentences broken up into three stanzas. In all its simplicity it could almost be mistaken for prose.
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Pendleton 2 Each stanza contributes to evoking different emotions and builds to support the underlying theme (Landau 9-11).” Direct Quotation: The speaker tells us of his fear in the eighth and ninth lines. He conveys the chilling, sullen aura of their home. In Line 9 Hayden uses metonymy by using "the house" to represent the people in it. Interestingly, Hayden does not explain the "chronic angers of that house." But one can speculate that the father is burdened by his low socioeconomic status. Also, the boy could interpret his father’s distress and fatigue to be anger toward him (Landau 59-61).” Direct Quotation: “The speaker confesses that as a child he was apathetic and cold toward his father in spite of all the latter’s hard work and devotion. Along with literally warming the house, the father was a servant who performed such mundane tasks as polishing his son’s shoes. This small image underscores the love the father must have had for the child. (Landau 72-74).”
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  • Spring '16
  • morris
  • Poetry, Ode, Stanza, Winter Sundays, Daniel Landau

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