Is present in the victorious nations as in the

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is present in the victorious nations as in the Germans, that they can just as suddenly become a victim of the demonic powers. "General suggestibility" plays a tremendous role in America today, and how much the Russians are already fascinated by the devil of power can easily be seen from the latest events, which must dampen our peace jubilations a bit. The most sensible in this respect are the English: their individualism saves them from falling for the slogan, and the Swiss share their amazement at the collective unreason. Then we must anxiously wait and see which way the demons go next? I have already suggested that the only salvation lies in the piecemeal work of educating the individual. That is not as hopeless as it may appear. The power of the demons is immense, and the most modern media of mass suggestion —press, radio, film, etc.—are at their service. But Christian- ity, too, was able to hold its own against an overwhelming 1 54 The Post-War Psychic Problems of the Germans adversary not by propaganda and mass conversions—that came later and was of little value—but by persuasion from man to man. And that is the way we also must go if we wish to conquer the demons. I don't envy you your task in writing about these things. I hope you will succeed in presenting my ideas in such a way that people won't find them too strange. Unfortunately it is my fate that other people, especially those who are themselves possessed by demons, think me mad because I believe in these powers. But that is their affair; I know they exist. There are demons all right, as sure as there is a Buchenwald. 155
FOUR "CONTACTS WITH JUNG" Michael Fordham, the leading medical analyst among British Jungians and co-editor of the Collected Works, edited Contact with Jung (London, 1966), a collection of "essays on the in- fluence of Jung's work and personality" by forty-two of Jung's pupils in Europe, England, America, and Israel. Excerpts from four vivid and immediate recollections, dating from the late 1930's to the late 1950's, have been chosen. (The selections from Charles Baudouin's journal for 1945 and 1954, in the present volume, were also included, in French, in Contact with lung.) A. I. ALLENBY (OXFORD) I first got in touch with Jung after the end of the second world war. I then wrote to him, and told him who I was and what I was doing, which included writing a thesis on the psychology of religion. With his reply Jung sent the manuscript of his article on the Trinity'—a new version which had not yet appeared in print. This was generous in- deed, and an endearing token of encouragement for the complete stranger that I was to him then. Only about a month before his death I again received a letter from Jung, in reply to one of mine, in which he went with great care into all the questions I had raised. It ended with these words: "My best wishes for any further discoveries you may make." This is the first characteristic one encountered in Jung: his respect for the other person, whoever he or she might be, and his concern for the individual value in anyone. When

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