Next on the stage two the transitional stage

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Next, on the stage two, the Transitional stage. Countries evolve beyond dependence on agriculture and begin to engage in simple manufacturing of value-added goods. The stage coincides with development of infrastructure in transportation, communications, and other areas. Entrepreneurs emerge who launch small firms that require basic inputs and trade in natural resources and other primary products. This stage clearly shows that countries tend to be more productive and produces a small percentage in GDP. Many late-stage developing economies for example, Honduras, Vietnam, and Zimbabwe are in the transitional phase. Moving on to the third stage, Take-off stage. Here workers progress from agriculture to manufacturing. Producers specialize and begin to mass produce goods that can be exchanged
with trading partners worldwide. Most emerging market countries such as Brazil, China, and Russia—have attained this stage. This increases wages for everyone, taking the economic structure from a structure of kings and servants to a wealthy class, middle class, and lower class. Urbanization and education rates increase over time in countries that remain in the stage, while dependence on agriculture decreases. (A General Framework and Taking Off into Growth; Daniela Costa, University of Minnesota; Timothy J. Kehoe, University of Minnesota; Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis National Bureau of Economic Research; Gajendran Raveendranathan, University of Minnesota) The fourth stage is Drive to maturity. In this stage, countries emphasize the production of high-technology products and development of a strong services sector. Late-stage emerging markets such as Poland, Saudi Arabia, and South Korea are examples. Processes are improved, quality of life is improved, and technology and new ideas continue to become more central to society, while the cost of producing the needs for survival (like food and shelter) becomes a smaller part of the economy. More importantly, the middle class grows at the quickest rate of any economic class. Mass consumption. Most countries have not reached this stage, which is characterized by a thriving consumer and industrial economy with a substantial services sector. The per capita real income increases to the level at which a large number of people can afford consumption transcending the basic food, shelter and clothing requirements. Consumers typically have disposable income, beyond all basic needs, for additional goods. Numerous advanced economies are in this category. CITATION (Czinkota, Michael R. International Marketing, 10th Edition. Cengage Learning, 2013) (Article Shared by Tushar Seth; Economic Discussion)
9. What are the main characteristics of the government buyer?

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