Arab view of zionism seeing zionism sort of as an

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Arab view of ZionismSeeing Zionism sort of as an extension of imperialism.More opposed to second Aliya because Arabs no longer able to work on Jewish land, led to economic disparity between poor Arabs and rich Jewish settlersPalestinian nationalism:Palestinian nationalism got much stronger following the second Aliya because they felt threatened. One nationalism breeds another.  Forged by publications in the early 1900s “Filastin”:A Christian Arab newspaper produced in Jaffa in 1911 warning of the Zionist movement which was written directly to the Palestinians.Naguib Azoury’s prediction:He predicted that the whole nation of Palestine would be fucked up for a long time, with many truths in his prediction as there remains conflict in that region today. He also called for Arabs to leave the Ottoman Empire, which he believes has betrayed themBalfour Declaration 1917: The British Empire promising the Jews that they would support them in Palestine. The problem with this is that the British already promised the Palestinians their support prior to aligning with the JewishSykes-Picot Agreement 1916:Agreement between the British, France, and Russia that defined their spheres of influence in the Middle East, effectively dividing the Ottoman Empire after its expected downfall.Convergence of imperialism and nationalismPart II: Passage Identifications (20%)1) “Though this acid may not be to the taste of everyone, yet it has played so decisive a part in the history of the epoch of a culture to which we belong that we ought to be grateful to the giver; instead of being indignant about it, we shall do better to inform ourselves thoroughly concerning the significance of this ‘entrance of the Jews into the history of the West,’ an event which in anycase exercised inestimable influence upon our whole culture, and which has not yet reached its full growth.” (Houston Chamberlain “The Foundations of the Nineteenth Century”)
Speaker is Houston Chamberlain, an anti-semitic British writer in 1914, writing about whether or not Jews can ever assimilate into western European culture. This fear was inspired by the Jewish exodus from Russia following the Russian pogroms of 1880s and Europeans were fearful of Jewish intrusion into their culture. He argued that Jews had kept their racial purity and didn’t want them to have miscegenation with the Europeans and create a race of “psuedo-Hebraic mestizos,” which were mixed Jewish and European peoples. He particularly feared the altering of European culture by the Jews and his views were denied by the British people and he migrated to Germany where he would be more accepted.2) “Forgetting, I would even go so far as to say historical error, is a crucial factor in the creation of a nation, which is why progress in historical studies often constitutes a danger for [the principle] of nationality. Indeed, historical enquiry brings to light deeds of violence which took

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