Think they are real words which can interfere with

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think they are real words, which can interfere with our ability to perceive the correct word ("first"), relative to words that are not easily pronounceable like "frsit". Keep in mind that you only want to manipulate one thing, so that you can be sure that your variable is responsible for any differences in the results. For example, in the above example, the easily pronounceable words should be the same length (number of letters) as the words not easily pronounceable, or one could not tell whether pronounceability or word length was the cause of differences in sentence comprehension. Materials and Procedure Create 10 sentences, 5 for one level of the variable and 5 for the other level. The sentences must follow these rules: Each sentence must contain at least 10 words. Within each sentence, at least 5 of the words must have 6 or more letters. Each word in each sentence must have the first and last letters' positions intact; how you rearrange the remaining intervening letters will depend on your variable. Carefully think about other ways that the 5 sentences in each level need to be similar (variables that you need to control), and list all variables that you controlled in the appropriate space. In your report, show each sentence in the designated spaces, and underline all of the rearranged words that have 6 or more letters. Administer the task to four people individually by giving each person one sentence at a time and asking them to read the sentence aloud as quickly as possible. Using a stopwatch (if you don't have one, find one on the web, like ; these are really easy to use), record the time it takes them to read each sentence out loud (in seconds, with two decimal places). Start timing as soon as you give them the sentence to read, and stop timing when they finish saying the last word. Have them read all 10 sentences, but present the sentences in a random order, making sure that the 5 sentences within each level are not presented consecutively. Results The dependent variable that you are measuring is reading time (the amount of time to read aloud each sentence), where faster reading times are thought to reflect better sentence comprehension. Compute the average reading time per word for each person as follows:
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First, compute the average reading time per word for each individual sentence . Divide each sentence's reading time by the number of words in each sentence. For example, if a person took 5.50 seconds to read one particular sentence, his/her average reading time per word for a sentence containing 10 words would be 5.50/10 = .55 seconds.
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  • Spring '08
  • Fasig
  • The tab, dnaincg wodeon

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