Public Health Nutrition 5 149155 Grudnik L 2014 US children snacking more junk

Public health nutrition 5 149155 grudnik l 2014 us

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Public Health Nutrition , 5 , 149–155. Grudnik, L., (2014). "U.S. children snacking more; junk calories leading the
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rise. " Health Science Spring 2010: 6. General OneFile . Web. 28 Apr. 2014. From ? id=GALE %7CA259792343&v=2.1&u=wilm19808&it=r&p=ITOF&sw= w&asid=a404eaacc34cfc6e571ec53ae33f1aa4 Karimi-shahanjarini, et. Al, (2012). Parental Control and Junk-Food Consumption: A Mediating and Moderating Effect Analysis. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 42, 5, pp. 1241–1265. Lois, A., (2014). Plant-based diet can raise energy level and contribute to well-being. Canadian press: Toronto, Ontario. Available; ? accountid=38531 Martens, M. K., van Assema, P., & Brug, J. (2005). Why do
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adolescents eat what they eat? Personal and social environmental predictors of fruit, snack, and breakfast consumption among 12-14-year-old Dutch students. Public Health Nutrition , 8 , 1258–1265. McNamara J., R., & Green J., P., (1991). Decreasing junk- food consumption through the use of self-management procedures: A case study. Psychol Rep ; 69:19-22. O.Connor et. al, (1993). School nutrition survey. Ireland Medical Journal 1993; 86: 89-91
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Pande, R., (2013). Avoid Junk Food. Retrieved on 28th April 2014 from - wellbeing-matters/341-avoid-junk-food SAGE Publications (2013, December 2). Junk Food, Poor Oral Health Increase Risk of Premature Heart Disease, ScienceDaily. Retrieved From sample_apa_research_paper_why_facebook_might_not_b.doc x Running head: WHY FACEBOOK MIGHT NOT BE GOOD FOR YOU1 WHY FACEBOOK MIGHT NOT BE GOOD FOR YOU 9
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Why Facebook Might Not Be Good for You: Some Dangers of Online Social Networks James Gardiner Seattle University Why Facebook
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Might Not Be Good for You: Some Dangers of Online Social Networks Walk into any computer lab at any college campus across the country and you’ll see dozen’s of students logged onto an online social network (OSN). In the last few years, the use of these networks has skyrocketed among Internet users, especially young adults. These new virtual communities are significantly influencing the way young people communicate and interact with one another. A report titled “E- Expectations: The Class of 2007” went so far as to label upcoming college freshmen “the Social-Networking Generation” (qtd. in Joly, 2007, para. 3). In late 2006, the Pew Internet Project, a nonpartisan, nonprofit research group that examines the social impact of the Internet, reported that 55 percent of online teens have created a personal profile on OSNs and that 48 percent of teens visit social networking Web sites daily, with 22 percent visiting several times a day (Lenhart and Madden, 2007). The two most popular OSNs are MySpace
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and Facebook. MySpace is a general networking site that allows anyone to join, develop a profile, and display personal information. In less than four years of existence, MySpace has exploded to become the third most visited Web site on the Internet behind only Google and Yahoo (“Top Sites,” n.d.) with more than 100 million members (Joly).
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