Social cognition developing a theory of mind certain

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Social Cognition – Developing a Theory of Mind Certain abilities are considered important early signs of a theory of mind (continued) Between 1 and 2 years, when infants engage in their first simple pretend play, they show a primitive understanding of the difference between pretense (a kind of false belief) and reality Imitation of other people in the first year of life reveals an ability to mentally represent their actions and possibly the goals or intentions behind them
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Social Cognition – Developing a Theory of Mind Emotional understanding (for example, comforting a playmate who is crying) reflects an understanding that other people have emotions and that these emotions can be influenced for good or bad
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Social Cognition – Developing a Theory of Mind Wellman (1990) theorized that children’s theories of mind develop in two phases Around age 2, children develop a desire psychology in which they explain their behavior and that of others in terms of wants or desires By age 4, children progress to a belief-desire psychology and understand that people do what they do because they desire certain things and because they believe that certain actions can help them fulfill their desires
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Social Cognition – Developing a Theory of Mind What are the roles of nature and nurture in the development of a theory of mind? In support of the role of nature Evolutionary theorists argue that having a theory of mind was adaptive for the evolution of the human species Development of a theory of mind requires a certain level of biological maturation, especially neurological and cognitive development Researchers believe that mirror neurons – neurons that are activated both when we perform an action and when we observe someone else perform the same action – are involved in theory-of-mind understandings
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Social Cognition – Developing a Theory of Mind What are the roles of nature and nurture in the development of a theory of mind? In support of the role of nurture, certain factors influence children’s development of a theory of mind Social interaction involving language Parental sensitivity to children’s needs and perspectives and the formation of secure attachments Especially important is parental “mind- mindedness,” which involves talking in elaborated and appropriate ways about children’s mental states Cultural perspectives on beliefs and thoughts
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Social Cognition – Developing a Theory of Mind Formulating a theory of mind has consequences for development Children who have mastered theory-of-mind tasks generally tend to have more advanced social skills and better social adjustment than those who have not They understand that others’ emotional responses might differ from their own, and they can think more maturely about moral issues Theory-of-mind skills also can be used for inappropriate purposes: bullies and good liars often are adept at “mind reading”
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Social Cognition – Describing and Evaluating Other People
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  • Fall '17
  • MarciaGuilliams
  • Lawrence Kohlberg, Kohlberg's stages of moral development

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