Badminton rackets are much lighter than most other sports rackets because they

Badminton rackets are much lighter than most other

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Badminton rackets are much lighter than most other sports rackets because they are made from materials such as carbon fiber or lighter metals such as aluminum. Parts of the racket include the head, throat, shaft and handle with a maximum length of 27.77 inches and a width of 9 inches. It Strings that are stretched across the opening of the racket in a checkerboard pattern, which acts as the hitting surface. Badminton rackets can vary widely in cost depending on whether they are purchased as part of a basic backyard set or as more expensive professional models. Shuttlecock The badminton shuttlecock, also referred to as a shuttle or birdie, acts similarly to a ball in other racket sports. However, the design of the birdie creates more drag as it is propelled through the air due to its feathered shape. The shuttlecock is made up of a cone shape with a hard cork at its tip. Shuttlecocks can be made from a variety of materials -- more expensive models are actually made from feathers, and less expensive models are made from plastic feathers. The shuttle has 16 feathers attached to the base and the length of the feathers range between 2.44 and 2.75 inches. Net A mesh net divides the badminton court into two sides. A badminton net is placed lower than a volleyball net at five feet and one inch high on the sides and five feet high in the center. The length may vary depending on whether doubles or singles are playing, with singles reaching 17 feet and doubles reaching 22 feet. The net is 30 inches wide with a 3-inch white tape doubled over the top. Facilities The badminton court should be 44 feet long by 22 feet wide if playing doubles, and 44 feet long by 17 feet wide for singles. If the facility is indoors, there needs to be enough height for the shuttlecock to be able to float across the net without hitting the ceiling. This height will vary depending on the strength of the players.
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Terminologies of Badminton Alley - Extension of the court by l 1/2 feet on both sides for doubles play. Back Alley - Area between the back boundary line and the long service line for doubles. Backcourt - Back third of the court, in the area of the back boundary lines. Balk - Any deceptive movement that disconcerts an opponent before or during the service; often called a "feint." Baseline - Back boundary line at each end of the court, parallel to the net. Carry - An illegal tactic, also called a sling or throw, in which the shuttle is caught and held on the racquet and then slung during the execution of a stroke. Center or Base Position - Location in the center of the court to which a singles player tries to return after each shot. Center Line - Line perpendicular to the net that separates the left and right service courts. Clear - A shot hit deep to the opponent’s back boundar>Nine. The high clear is a defensive shot, while the flatter attacking clear is used offensively.
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