used to take advantage of less savvy inmates 3 criminal versatility that allows

Used to take advantage of less savvy inmates 3

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used to take advantage of less savvy inmates; (3) criminal versatility that allows habitual offenders to engage in assorted acts of misconduct with fluidity; and (4) an inflated sense of self that can contribute to attempts to intimidate, coerce, and prey upon other inmates. Although Allender and Marcell’s profile has not been empirically tested; prior research suggests that because of their high-rate criminality, chronic offenders are a significant risk to prison order. For example, 60 years ago, Schrag (1954) found that individuals, who emerged as inmate leaders had served multiple prior terms in prison, were often incarcerated for the most serious forms of crime, had been diagnosed as psychopathic, and had been adjudicated as habitual criminals. Most importantly, career criminals/inmate leaders committed significantly more major rule violations, including escape and assaulting other inmates and staff.Gang Violence 6
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ReferencesAllender, D. M., & Marcell, F. (2003). Career criminals, security threat groups, and prison gangs: An interrelated threat. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, 72, 8–12. %20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfBattin, S. R., Hill, K. G., Abbott, R. D., Catalano, R. F., & Hawkins, J. D. (1998). The contribution of gang membership to delinquency above and beyond delinquent friends. Criminology, 36, 93–115. %20Career%20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfBlumstein, A., Cohen, J., Roth, J. A., & Visher, C. (Eds.) (1986). Criminal Careers and ‘Career Criminals’. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. %20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfChin, K. (1996). Chinatown Gangs: Extortion, Enterprise, and Ethnicity. New York: Oxford University Press. %20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfCurry, G. D. (2000). Self-reported gang involvement and officially recorded delinquency. Criminology, 38, 1253–1274. %20Career%20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfDecker, S. H., & Curry, G. D. (2002). Gangs, gang homicides, and gang loyalty: Organized crimes or disorganized criminals. Journal of Criminal Justice, 30, 343–352. %20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfFong, R. S., & Vogel, R. E. (1995). A comparative analysis of prison gang members, security threat group inmates, and general population prisoners in the Texas Department of Corrections. Journal of Gang Research, 2, 1–12. %20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdfHowell, J. C., Egley, A., & Gleason, D. K. (2002). Modern-day Youth Gangs. Juvenile Justice Bulletin. Washington, DC: US Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.
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