2012 Winfree Jr L T Mays G L Crowley J

2012 winfree jr l t mays g l crowley j

This preview shows page 40 - 45 out of 45 pages.

2012. Winfree, Jr., L. T., Mays, G. L., Crowley, J. E., & Peat, B. J. (1994). Drug history and prisonization: Toward understanding variations in inmate institutional adaptations. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 38, 281–296. Accessed on 01, Now 2012 from %20Members%20Career%20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdf Winfree, L. T., Jr., Vigil-Backstrom, T., & Mays, G. L. (1994). Social learning theory, self- report delinquency, and youth gangs. Youth & Society, 26, 147–177. Accessed on 01, Now 2012 from %20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdf Winfree, Jr., L. T., Mays, G. L., Crowley, J. E., & Peat, B. J. (1994). Drug history and prisonization: Toward understanding variations in inmate institutional adaptations. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 38, 281–296. Accessed on 01, Now 2012 from %20Members%20Career%20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdf Wooldredge, J. D. (1994). Inmate crime and victimization in a southwestern correctional facility.
Image of page 40
40 Journal of Criminal Justice, 14, 1–25. Accessed on 01, Now 2012 from %20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdf Wooldredge, J., Griffin, T., & Pratt, T. (2001). Considering hierarchical models for research on inmate behavior: Predicting misconduct with multilevel data. Justice Quarterly, 18, 203– 231. Accessed on 25, Nov 2012 from %20Members%20Career%20Criminals%20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdf Zaitzow, B. H., & Houston, J. G (1999). Prison gangs: The North Carolina experience. Journal of Gang Research, 6, 23–32. Accessed on 01, Now 2012 from %20%26%20Prison%20Vioolence.pdf * On p. 189, the 6 th ed. manual says “We recommend that when DOIs are available, you include them”—so you can skip the DOI if you can’t find it. Footnotes like this aren’t appropriate in a real references section.
Image of page 41
41 Appendix In a thesis or dissertation you might have bulky groups of information that are best placed in appendixes. If you have multiple groups of information, create multiple appendixes that are labeled with capital letters—e.g., Appendix A, Appendix B, Appendix C. Of course, you should refer to these appendices by name in appropriate locations in the text (e.g., “The full survey is available in Appendix B” or “The scenarios used in the three conditions appear in Appendix C”).
Image of page 42
42 Footnotes 1 Each footnote number must correspond to the same number in the body of the paper. Some professional journals ask authors to avoid using footnotes and in an undergraduate paper they are almost never necessary. 2 As of 2009, I do not recommend using the footnote and endnote features in Word if you want to keep your footnotes in APA format.
Image of page 43
43 Table 1 Correlations Among and Descriptive Statistics For Key Study Variables M ( SD ) Sex Age Income Educ. Relig. Dist. Intol. Sex 1.53 (.50) .07 -.09 .02 .14 .06 Age 31.88 (10.29) .08 .19* .20* .01 Income 2.60 (1.57) .04 -.14 -.09 Education 3.44 (1.06) -.29* -.06 Relig. 1.21 (.30) -.19* Dist. Intol. 3.75 (1.19) Notes. N ’s range from 107 to 109 due to occasional missing data. For sex, 0 = male, 1 = female. BHF = babies hoped for. Dist. Intol. = distress intolerance. Relig. = religiosity. * p < .05.
Image of page 44
44 Figure 1.   This simple path model, adapted from results in a Journal of Consumer Behaviour paper, is an example of a figure. Alcohol Consumption Frugality Amount that Gets Spent on Alcohol
Image of page 45

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture