debate games have been said to cause among other things delinquency aggression

Debate games have been said to cause among other

This preview shows page 17 - 19 out of 344 pages.

debate: games have been said to cause, among other things, delinquency, aggression,  prostitution, and gambling (see, e.g. Skow, 1982).  As Ofstein (1991) noted, those who seek to ban and control video games have  taken on the role and the tone of the elders of mythical River City in the play  The Music  Man . In the story, a wily con man, sensing the paranoia and gullibility of the elders, plays on their fears for profit. He convinces them that they have got trouble, “right here in  River City,” that stems from their children playing pool and reading cheap novels—in  other words, they have wasted their educational free time and are at risk because of their  choice of play forms and degraded media. The solution, this pied piper tells them, is to  buy loads of expensive musical instruments. This high art will surely keep the truancy  7
Image of page 17
and corruption of the pool halls, comic books and dime novels away. The story is a  morality play about gullibility, but it is also about finger pointing at the mass media  rather than dealing with real issues. At the same time, it is emblematic of the Right’s  patriarchal fears about delinquency. In mainstream reactions to new media, the River City effect is as alive and well as it has ever been for previous media. One need only look at the discourses surrounding  video games and the Internet to see that the same themes have been recycled. The same  can be said for the research community, which continues to focus on truancy, addiction  and the like among game users. For Internet use, the research is concerned with isolation,  social breakdowns and deviancy, but the antisocial gist is the same. If there is a  difference in the forms of antisocial behavior assumed in these two media, it is primarily  an artifact of the age stereotypes that accompany them. For games, the focus is on  children and teens, and for the Internet it is on teens and adults. Regardless, the actual  source of the tension often lies not in the new media, but in preexisting social issues. The tensions over new media are surprisingly predictable, in part because the  issues that drive them are enduring ones such as intra-class strife and societal guilt.  Communication researchers Wartella and Reeves have demonstrated that fears about new technologies inevitably involve children (Wartella & Reeves, 1983, 1985). They show  that these fears consistently follow a regular cycle: First, fears emerge out of concern that the new medium might be displacing a more socially acceptable activity. Then fears of  health effects appear, followed by fears about social ills.  8
Image of page 18
Image of page 19

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 344 pages?

  • Spring '17
  • stacy braiuca

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes