There are other types of strikes sick out slow down

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There are other types of strikes: sick out, slow down, sit down strikes, and sympathy strike. The sick out strike occurs when all or a significant number of members call in sick on the same day. The slow down strike occurs when all members continue to come to work on time and do their job. They just do it more slowly. This might be considered a partial strike. The sit down strike is when the employees show up but refuse to work, they also refuse to leave. There is also a sympathy strike. Sympathy strike is when one union in a specific industry goes on strike, other unions in the same industry go on strike at the same time. (Grabianowski, 2006). Sometimes during a strike a company will hire scabs and strikebreakers. The scabs will show up at the picket line and the strikebreakers escort the scabs over the picket line so they can do the work of the strikers.
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7 Unions in the Workplace Negotiations are a meeting of the minds, the employer and an agent who represents the employees. The representative for the employees negotiates with the employers on various things such as; wages, hours, and working conditions. There are also other factors to address like fringe benefits; this includes pensions, health care, and other similar issues. The list might also include what hours the employee will work, meal breaks, and any other working condition of interest to the employees. There are many factors to address when negotiating (Craver, 2005). The agent who represents the employees needs to do his or her homework. The pre-negotiation preparation needs to be thorough. She or she should have a sit down with the employees and determine what they want and prioritize it. Negotiations sometimes encounter difficult topics that neither side can surrender without a substantial loss of face. If they are cannot obtain a mutually acceptable outcome, they can invoke the contractual grievance-arbitration procedures. When this happens they each bring in someone from the outside to review the information and make a choice for the union. If either side does not agree with the outcome they can blame the outside that made the decision. By doing this the company and the union representative continue their relationship without unnecessary acrimony (Craver, 2005). Center for American Progress Action Fund. (2009). Retrieved from http://www.americanprogressaction.org/issues/2009/02/efca_factsheets.html Benefits of joining a union. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.spfpa.org/benefits- joining-union.html Craver, C. (2005) Collective Bargaining Interactions, Internet Article Grabianowski, E. (2006) How Strikes Work, Internet Article
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8 Bronars, S. G., & Deere, D. R. (1993, January). Unionization, Incomplete Contracting, and Capital Investment. Journal of Business, 66(1), 117-132. Hirsch, B. T. (1992, Winter). Firm Investment Behavior and Collective Bargaining Strategy. Industrial Relations, 31(1), 95-121.
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