My apple trees will never get across And eat the cones under his pines I tell

My apple trees will never get across and eat the

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My apple trees will never get across And eat the cones under his pines, I tell him. He only says, 'Good fences make good neighbors.' Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder If I could put a notion in his head: 'Why do they make good neighbors? Isn't it Where there are cows? But here there are no cows. Before I built a wall I'd ask to know What I was walling in or walling out, And to whom I was like to give offense. Something there is that doesn't love a wall, That wants it down.' I could say 'Elves' to him, But it's not elves exactly, and I'd rather He said it for himself. I see him there Bringing a stone grasped firmly by the top In each hand, like an old-stone savage armed. He moves in darkness as it seems to me, Not of woods only and the shade of trees. He will not go behind his father's saying, And he likes having thought of it so well He says again, 'Good fences make good neighbors.'
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ANALYSIS The second poem I read was called The Mending Wall by Robert Frost. Throughout the poem I picked up some symbolic differences between the neighbors, though they are extremely unalike they balance each other out to an extent which ends up being beneficial. The whole idea behind this relationship seems to try and represent immigration into the United States. During the 20th century immigrants and natives could decipher and decode the differences between their cultures easily, whereas building a friendship was quite a bit more challenging.
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“Anybody looking for a quiet life has picked the wrong century to born in.” -Whitaker Chambers
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  • Spring '16
  • ratcliffe
  • Carl Sandburg

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