Hill et al MIFIRA Uganda Draft Report 2011.doc

There was talk of this in one small trading location

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There was talk of this in one small trading location (along the lines of “tell them you’re a maize Page 10
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trader, you’ll get 10,000 shillings!”) that was overheard by one of our enumerators. However, in most cases the sum was not significant enough to induce such behavior. This should enter into consideration for future surveys, in that the sum should be decided so as to be a pleasant surprise, but not enough to start rumors or to be ‘worth’ up to 2 hours of answering tiring questions. d. Field Study Overview A key decision to be made upon arrival in Uganda was which commodities and over which markets to cover. Given that the goal was to assess the supply responsiveness in light of a ‘demand shock’ from an outside buyer, the key procurement commodities were the necessary focus of interest. We were interested initially in encompassing the three main procurement commodities for WFP, maize, beans, and vegetable oil. However, due to time constraints, aided by a previous study that used market analysis in the western part of Uganda (Sserunkuuma 2005), and source markets for WFP procurement of maize, we chose to survey in the eastern part of Uganda. We learned quickly that vegetable oil is commercially produced and not amenable to a study of this nature, which left us with beans and maize. Beans are grown in western Uganda and given that we chose to survey in eastern Uganda, any beans traders we encountered were sourcing through beans markets in Kampala. Since we were seeking to study source markets and the supply chain, and, in light of the shortness of time and the trade-offs discussed above, we decided to focus exclusively on maize. Focusing on maize allowed us to maximize the depth of the study in the paucity of time available. We initially piloted and developed the survey in Kampala. We then followed the supply chain through both space and market levels, and interviewed 119 maize wholesalers, brokers, and aggregators in large and small markets up the Eastern marketing belt from Kampala to Lira. The numbers of traders interviewed in each category, by district, are presented in Table 1. In addition to the formal surveys we interviewed key informants. These included traders as well as several chairmen of traders’ and farmers’ associations. For the key informant interview we covered similar areas as the survey, but focused on the informants’ areas of expertise and asked more open-ended questions to facilitate a broader range of learning and develop lessons for future studies. e. The Markets The markets we surveyed range from source markets to wholesale and export markets; several play multiple roles. While not random, the types of traders interviewed (as reflected in Page 11
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Table 1) roughly reflect the types of traders dominant in each of these markets. Please see Figure 3 for a map of Ugandan maize markets. Dokolo is uniquely a source market, where aggregators from larger markets travel to purchase maize. The same is largely true for Lira, although it also serves as a wholesale and export market for the northbound route to Sudan.
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