Converts allocators mental states into differential

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: converts allocators’ mental states into differential behavioro(3) Societal: depends on external social and economic factors including normativeconsiderations within establishments’ institutional communities, expectation of clientele, collective bargaining agreements, can check or permit other levelso(4) Organizational: practices, usually affecting access to information about ascribed characteristics, by which employers and their agents link worker’s ascriptive characteristics to work outcomes; can check or permit other levelsoMotive based explanations assume group homogeneity; Limited in scope, applying only to ascriptive inequality stemming from the actions of entities that can engage in purposeful behavior; Causal priority over outcomes cannot be assumed; and Absence of mechanisms. oInstead, we should use mechanisms, which are intervening variables that link ascribed characteristics to outcomes of varying desirability. Historical Policy OrloffEsping-Andersen31
Social Stratification Study Guide |Fischer KallebergoRise of Precarious Work as a Mechanismfor the Rising Income Inequality after 1970s: Precarious work has contributed to greater economic inequality and insecurity because earnings have become more volatile and unstable, and the economic security of the middle class has continued to decline.What approach to stratification will be the most helpful in understanding new (if indeed they are new) patterns of social inequality (income)? (2007)oInstitutional perspective oNetworks/social capital oBringing Marx back oAlso bringing status back (Weber, Chan and Goldthorpe, Ridgeway, Correll) oSen/Oliver and Shapiro – think biggeroPolicy intentionality and the law Income inequality in the United States has risen dramatically over the past 40 years. In your answer (1) describe the basic trends in income inequality; (2) provide a discussion of the major explanations for its precipitous rise; (3) discuss the major consequences of rising inequality, 4) what changes should we expect going forward (2014) Kalleberg, Arne L. 2000. “The Rise of Precarious Work.” oMid-1970s marked normative shift from standard to non-standard work arrangements (i.e. precarious employment characterized by flexibility and insecurity) among developedcountries largely due to an increase in global price competition. oEvidence of the growth of precarious work includes: a) Increase in long-term unemployment b) Growth in perceived job insecurity c) Increase in risk-shift fromemployers to employeesoRise of Precarious Work as a Mechanismfor the Rising Income Inequality after 1970s: Precarious work has contributed to greater economic inequality and insecurity because earnings have become more volatile and unstable, and the economic security of the middle class has continued to decline.Fernandez, Roberto M. 2001. “Skill-Biased Technological Change and Wage Inequality: Evidence from a Plant Retooling.” oSBTC increased wage dispersion and racial inequality, not wages overall, but was mediated with organizational / human resource factors.o

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