Public Speaking Reading Notes

Credibility cant be based off of gov com or net and

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Also, the internet can sometimes not be credible. Credibility can’t be based off of .gov, .com, or .net, and articles can be written by uni-funded authors To test credibility, research the credibility of an author Look into a website’s or organization’s website’s objective or purpose to identify potential bias How credible are the web sites to and from this site? Does another credible source offer similar facts and opinions? Does this site weigh both sides of the argument or topic evenly? Is there advertising on the site? Use search engines, advanced search, or metasearch engines that combine results from several search engines Web directories increase your chance of finding credible sources, and hybrid search engines combine searches with web directories The “invisible web” is results on the internet from things such as databases, video content, or forum conversation Interviewing sources: Prepare for interview, find out who you can interview for your topic Set up your interview Plan interview questions Conduct the interview, start with friendly, easy questions, but stay focused and maintain eye contact, be open to new information, listen carefully, and possibly tape the interview with consent Check to see if you got all the info that you’d like to use in your speech Presenting evidence: Document all sources Cite all sources Paraphrase responsibly, but don’t skew an author or expert’s opinion in order to support your own (power wording) Chapter 8: Supporting materials are what you use to develop your main points and they become the building blocks of your speech. You research them. Select supporting material that motivates or interests your audience. Don’t talk about erroneous or irrelevant supporting materials. Therefore, supporting material builds audience interest Supporting materials enhance audience understanding of a topic Supporting materials help your viewpoint claim merit of consideration, and win audience agreement Supporting materials evoke audience emotion Types of supporting material:
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Examples, brief or extended Definitions, dictionary or expert, etymological (linguistic origin, root of the word), or functional definition (how something is used or what it does) Testimony consists of information provided by other people. Expert testimony consists of statements made by credible sources who have professional or other in-depth knowledge of a topic. Lay testimony consists of statements made by persons with no special expertise Statistics are information or data presented in numerical form However, limit the number of stats your present, use visual aids to present your stats, and establish context Narratives are anecdotes that support main point Analogies are comparison based similarities between two phenomena. They can be literal and compare two things of the same category, or figurative, an compare two distinct and different things Guidelines for supporting materials Choose the most credible proof Use a variety of supporting material Appeal to different learning styles
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