6 Educational institutions Universities registered training organisations RTOs

6 educational institutions universities registered

This preview shows page 66 - 68 out of 75 pages.

6. Educational institutions Universities, registered training organisations (RTOs) including TAFEs for: courses leading to formal qualifications short courses and specialised training research and consulting. 7. Industry groups, unions, employer associations Advice on: your business policies and best practice procedures health and safety knowledge and skills required. 8. Lawyers and solicitors Advice on: contract development and implementation compliance with legislation and regulatory requirements patents, trademarks and intellectual property legal defence against others (for example claims from customers or other businesses) or internally (for example unfair dismissal claim). 9. Professional associations Advice on a range of matters plus training and development courses. Examples of professional associations include: Association for Tertiary Education Management Australian Institute of Management Australian Marketing Institute Certified Practising Accountants Governance Institute of Australia 10. Publications, the internet
Page 66 of 74 Advice is available on many areas of business that could relate to operational planning and the implementation of operational plans. Use a search engine to find information on any topic. Coaching In an educational sense, coaching generally refers to a one-on-one relationship but can also apply to a team, such as a coach for a sales team. The coaching can be facilitated by you, a designated staff member or contracted to an external person. This person engages with employees, provides training, observes performance and provides feedback to achieve the desired outcomes. Some tactics used by coaches of sporting teams are also useful for managers in the workplace. Assuming a coaching role can be an effective strategy at both an individual and team level. The sports arena is similar to the workplace in that a team needs to be selected and trained well, there is always a goal and a plan of attack, and there is a lot to be learned along the way. Helping individuals perform at their best and motivating them to succeed and achieve their goals is what sporting coaches do every day. Yet coaching also works well in the workplace and many managers and team leaders would do well to think of themselves as sporting coaches, striving for their team to achieve their goals. A comprehensive book on coaching and mentoring by Nigro, which includes case studies, may be of interest: Nigro, N 2008, The everything coaching and mentoring book: increase productivity, foster talent, and encourage success, F+W Publications Inc., Avon, MA, USA. Techniques used by sports coaches that may be useful in the workplace include: helping and encouraging team members to be an expert or 'pro' at what they do setting goals for individuals that are unique to that person and reflect their abilities and personal aspirations using collaborative techniques that give team members some control over the way things are done and a sense of ownership in the process

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