It creates a promise that when a merchant sells goods they are fit for their

It creates a promise that when a merchant sells goods

This preview shows page 36 - 38 out of 46 pages.

.
Image of page 36
buyer's examination of goods can create a disclaimer. Trade usage can do the same. The text spells out the requirements for an effective disclaimer.When a warranty exists and is breached, an injured person or firm can sue for damages. Because these cases are brought under contract law, plaintiffs can seek compensatory but not punitive damages. As with any type of case, defendants can sometimes avoid liability by successfully raising a valid defense, such as the statute of limitations has run out. When you read the section "limitations on damages," compare the specific types described to those we covered in Unit 4 on tort law.A final idea related to torts is negligence. Negligence is sometimes more appealing to plaintiffs than warranty law. Recall that in Unit 4, we introduced the concept of negligence.  Applying those ideas to the issue at hand, sellers have a duty to use reasonable care when selling, and may have additional responsibilities. They may breach their duties by failing to warn consumers of foreseeable dangers, or if products are carelessly manufactured or designed. Disclaimers that can end implied warranty obligations usually do not prevent a negligence lawsuit, and so negligence can create an alternate legal path for a plaintiff to follow. But in some cases, proving 
Image of page 37
Image of page 38

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 46 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • BREDESON
  • attorney, federal court

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture