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So the team supported these results by observing

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which often happen. So the team supported these results by observing animal and plant fossils recovered from the sediment, e.g. the 'southern mammoth'. The known overlap time between the appearance of some species and the disappearance of others tapers down the date bracket. The analysis that the researchers made, which also involves geological verification from the ancient River Thames, signifies that Happisburgh was occupied by the early humans around 840,000 or 950,000 years ago, during the later part of a warm interglacial period. THE SURPRISE FIND Though at nearby Pakefield in 2005, indication of human activity 700,000 years ago was found, these findings came as a bolt from the blue to the researchers. The researchers had accepted that people were there in the area 700,000 years ago, and could describe it by the fact that the environment was really warm at that time. The animals and plants in Britain at this time were the identical as the ones in Spain. So, they could have come up momentarily under warm, peak temperatures, but were considered to have died out very hastily when it got cold. Exactly, it is not known that how the early humans adapted to the colder climate; whether they built shelters, used clothing or made fires. Further, as there are
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So the team supported these results by observing animal and...

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