Our hearts take such a beating throughout our lives Its a wonder they last

Our hearts take such a beating throughout our lives

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Our hearts take such a beating throughout our lives. It’s a wonder they last nearly as long as they do. We put ourselves through so much, making promises to our future selves that we’ll be happy and healthy. “So much is held in a heart in a lifetime. So much held in a heart in a day, an hour, a moment” (Doyle 148). We go on gathering love and the pains that inevitably go with it and fill our souls with so much happiness, so many thoughts, and an incredible amount of sadness. I’ve always believed that in order to truly feel what an emotion is capable of, you have to experience its exact opposite emotion. The fifth paragraph in Joyas Voladoras goes on to explain different species which signify the different types of people we have in this world. This is the part of the essay that brings
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Stamper 6 together all of what he’s been trying to describe metaphorically. “We all churn inside” (Doyle 148). We’re all the same on the inside, but we all choose different paths and different speeds to get there. Doyle’s representation of the heart and all of its magnificence and difficulties, makes this essay a metaphorical masterpiece. When I finally came to the realization that Doyle was actually speaking about how humans cope and interact with others I was immediately reminded how certain events in our lives can have hard physical effects that stem from an emotional cause. None of us are ever fully immune to the effects that human interactions, or lack thereof, can have on our state of being. But, even knowing that we will get them torn out in the end, we gladly accept the hope that we will find what we’re searching for, and give our hearts to chance. The sixth and final paragraph is where Doyle tells the reader to live every single moment of life. “We open windows to each but we live alone in the house of the heart” (Doyle 148). I feel we do this as a defense mechanism. This is how we gauge people and try to understand them before we let them try to understand us. “You can brick up your heart as stout and tight and hard and cold and impregnable as you possibly can and down it comes in an instant” (Doyle 148). We get taken by surprise by someone at some time and it tears the wall down without us even knowing it. It happens so suddenly that we almost can’t even tell what happened. Like the Grinch or Mr. Scrooge , something forces us out of our bricked up house to make the change that our hearts already decided to make. “Felled by a woman’s second glance, a child’s apple breath, the shatter of glass in the road, the words I have something to tell you” (Doyle 148). Memories and the emotions tied to them will constantly keep us looking on.
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Works Cited Doyle, Brian. “Joyas Voladoras.” Ways of Reading. 10 th ed. Ed. David Bartholomae, Anthony Petrosky, and Stacey Waite. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2014. 146-149. Print.
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