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Radiation effects and the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan. Diplomatic History, 36 (3), 515 545. Retrieved from - live&scope=site Reynolds, M. L., & Lynch, F. X. (1955). Atomic bomb injuries among survivors in Hiroshima. Public Health Reports, 70 (3), 261 270. Retrieved from Government and Domestic Policy How did the dropping of the atomic bomb affect domestic policies and decisions made by the American government? How did the dropping of the atomic bomb relate to the start of the Cold War and the United States’ policy to contain communism? How did it relate to the United States’ rise as a global superpower? How did it relate to policies surrounding the limits of executive power? Primary The Associated Press. (1945, Aug. 6 14). AP was there: US drops atomic bombs on Japan in 1945. Retrieved from Atomic Archive. (2015). Historical documents and reports . Retrieved from Atomic Heritage Foundation & Los Alamos Historical Society. (n.d.). Voices of the Manhattan Project [Tape recordings]. Retrieved from Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. (n.d.). The decision to drop the atomic bomb . Retrieved from
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Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. (1946, July 1). United States strategic bombing survey: Japan's struggle to end the war, July 1, 1946 . Retrieved from d=68&studycollectionid=abomb&pagenumber=1 The National Security Archive. (2015, Aug. 4). The atomic bomb and the end of World War II: A collection of primary sources . Retrieved from Stimson, H. L. (1947). The decision to use the atomic bomb. Harper’s Magazine , 194 (1161), 97 107. Retrieved from - son_harpers.pdf Truman, H. (1953, Jan. 12). Truman's reflections on the atomic bombings. Atomic Archive . Retrieved from Truman, H. (1945, Aug. 6). Press release by the White House, August 6, 1945 . Retrieved from - 06&documentid=59&pagenumber=1
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