If a patient has been newly prescribed furosemide or has been prescribed an

If a patient has been newly prescribed furosemide or

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If a patient has been newly prescribed furosemide, or has been prescribed an increased dose of this or another diuretic, is it reasonable to place a Foley catheter? Methods to Prevent Catheter Related Infections(6 items) Response options = Not effective at all, Possibly effective, No effect or unknown, Moderately effective, Very effectiveHow effective do you think the each of the listed interventions is in preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infections? Removing catheters as early as possible. Using a condom catheter instead of a Foley catheter, if possible. Using intermittent (straight) catheterization instead of a Foley catheter. Using catheters coated with antimicrobial substances. Using antimicrobial agents in the drainage bag. Using automated reminders to discontinue/renew the order for catheter.Table 1. Nurses’ Knowledge Survey Items
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UROLOGIC NURSING / November-December 2018 / Volume 38 Number 6277item survey originally developed by Drekonja, Kuskowski, and Johnson (2010) to measure nurs-es’ knowledge of indications for urinary catheter placement and the prevention of CAUTIs. Specifically, the 14 items select-ed represented three of the four subscales of the original 18-item survey and were used with the author’s permission. The knowledge of institution-al policiessubscale consisted of three items that asked partici-pants for a yes/no response to questions regarding their knowl-edge of current facility policies. Responses were scored “1” for yes and “0” for no. A second subscale, indications for Foley catheter use, consisted of five items presented in 5-point Likert format (1 = not indicated; 5 = always indicated) that assessed knowledge regarding catheter indi-cations in specific clinical situa-tions. The third subscale, methods to prevent catheter related infec-tions (CAUTIs),included six items presented in 5-point Likert format (1 = not effective at all; 5 = very effective) and measured knowl-edge regarding CAUTI prevention. Items on the latter two subscales were scored as “correct” or “incor-rect” based on published evidence and expert opinion on urinary catheter care. Appropriate indica-tions for catheterization (scored “correct”) included critical ill-ness/unstable volume status and post-bladder urinary obstruction. Urinary incontinence, inability to stand to void, and increased diuretic dose were scored as “incorrect.” For methods to pre-vent CAUTI, all items except one (i.e., antimicrobial agents added to drainage bag) were “correct.” Each “correct” response was scored 1 and each “incorrect” response scored 0. Scores for each subscale were obtained by summing the items for the subscale. A knowl-edge summary score was obtained by summing the responses of all 14 items. For the summary and sub-scale scores, higher scores reflect-ed a higher level of knowledge.
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