ch07

Psychology in Action

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Brain-Based Learning Activity 7.4 – Deep Processing Instructor’s Resource Guide Chapter 7            Page   231
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Students often confuse deep processing with hours spent looking at the textbook. To emphasize the importance not only of the amount of encoding but also the variety of approaches, present the following exercise: Pick a concept from the chapter (chunking, 3 stage model) and write it on the board. Make sure that each student has a basic grasp of its meaning. Then challenge the students to generate a list of ALL the ways that this concept could be taught or remembered. The more creative the suggestions the better. Examples include but are not limited to: Write it down; read it out loud; teach it to a buddy; draw it as a picture; make it into a song; create a mind map; act it as a mime; generate three examples from your work; generate three examples from your home; create a symbol or series of symbols for it; invent a headline for a newspaper article about it, or a best selling book on the concept etc. This is an excellent tie in to discuss multiple intelligences and diverse learning styles. The list illustrates that different students have different preferences and levels of familiarity with these approaches. Brain-Based Learning Activity 7.5 – Movies and Memory As a homework project students can rent videos such as: Total Recall, Rashomon, Dead Again, Groundhog Day, The Matrix, or similar movies which question the ability to remember or the ability to distinguish virtual reality (illusionary memory?) from actual reality. After viewing one of these videos students would write a short reaction paper addressing the following issues: What did the movie teach about memory? What was the most important cognitive understanding you gained? What was the most important emotional understanding you gained? Instructor’s Resource Guide Chapter 7            Page   232
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H andout 7.1 – Brain-Based Learning Comparing Memory Techniques Advantages Disadvantages Other Factors Example Peg Method Loci Method Substitute Word SQ4R Instructor’s Resource Guide Chapter 7            Page   233
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  C ritical T hinking Critical Thinking Exercise 7.1 - Applying Knowledge to New Situations: Remembering Names It is widely known that learning and remembering names is an important social asset, yet many students (and instructors) report that this is one of their poorest skills. Given the focus of this chapter, it would be appropriate to offer students specific help in remembering names. The ability to transfer new information to other concepts is also an important critical thinking skill. Time: Approximately 20 minutes. Part I: Invite seven students who don't know each other to the front of the room. Casually introduce the seven students to the class, or have each student introduce himself or herself. Announce that they will participate in a short-term memory experiment. Have the student volunteers take turns counting
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