In contrast NWPs transformation depended on the provincial district and school

In contrast nwps transformation depended on the

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are looking for solutions to come from the top. In contrast, NWP’s transformation depended on the provincial, district and school management teams taking responsibility and ownership of the challenges they faced. NWP’s experience also shows that it is not just a matter of providing training for education managers. It is, more crucially, the ability to simulate leadership. Key in this regard is how leadership practice at multiple levels (province, district, and school level) creates incentives to motivate others to improve performance. NWP has also capitalized on mining companies to support its incentive initiatives. As Zambia moves to effect fiscal decentralization, education managers will require support in developing problem solving skills. Most education managers have risen through the ranks without exposure to management practice. Furthermore, the false dichotomy that splits education administration and academic in the public school system has undermined the supervision of teaching and learning. In private schools, head teachers are as involved in administration as they are in academic work because ultimately they are held accountable for the performance of their school. 5. Conclusion The phenomenal growth in access and participation in Zambia is the result of four decisive factors: Pragmatic policy initiatives in the face of a dire situation of sectoral underperformance; increased budgetary allocations to the education sector; communities taking action to salvage the general decline in the education service delivery; and concerted action from the international community. The combination of these measures has enabled Zambia to make progress on both EFA and MDG goals. Looking beyond 2015, EFA goals will continue to be relevant. The priorities of the past 15 years have not changed. ECE (Goal 1) will help children to enter primary school equipped with basic learning skills. Achieving universal access (Goal 2) remains a difficult challenge given limited school places and the backlog of children who are yet to enter the school system. Addressing the learning needs of youth (Goal 3) is ever more critical given Zambia’s predominantly youthful population. The situation of young people, particularly girls, requires innovative approaches to offer them employment opportunities as well as protect them from vices and abuse. Adult literacy (Goal 4) is strategic in many respects. It is empowering for adults and essential for children’s learning support. Parents and guardians who are able to read can help children to develop
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Page 38 of 43 reading skills and persist in education. Eliminating gender inequities (Goal 5) remains a challenge despite Zambia’s exceptional levels of gender parity. Moving beyond equal numbers, the task for the future is to resolutely improve the quality aspect of participation.
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