You can reduce the space used by primary partitions

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You can reduce the space used by primary partitions and logical drives by shrinking them into an adjacent continuous space on the same disk. If you need an additional partition, but don't have additional disks, you can shrink the existing partition from the end of the volume to create new unallocated space that can be used for a new partition. When you shrink a partition, ordinary files are automatically relocated on the disk to create the new unallocated space, there is no need to reformat the hard disk to shrink the partition, but, keep in mind that the shrink operation can be blocked by the presence of certain file types. Also, if the partition is a raw partition, a partition without a file system on it, and it contains data, like a database file, then shrinking the partition could destroy the data. Volume 9:42-10:16 Now, just creating a partition on the hard disk drive does not allow you to use the storage spacewithin that partition. Before you can access that storage space, you have to format that partition with a file system. This is done by creating a volume. A volume can encompass a single partition on a single disk, and a volume can span multiple partitions on a single disk. It can also span multiple partitions on multiple disks. There are a couple of things that you have to understand in order to make this work. The first thing that you have to understand is that within Windows, there are two different types of disks. A basic disk and a dynamic disk. Basic Disk 10:17-11:29 A basic disk could contain primary partitions, and an extended partition with logical partitions defined within it on a basic disk. A basic disk could have up to four partitions, including extended partitions. One of the key benefits of basic disks is the fact that they can be accessed by any operating system, for example, a basic disk can be accessed by DOS, Windows and Linux. Because we're creating our volumes on a basic disk, the volumes are called basic volumes. A basic disk can only host basic volumes. Let's talk about some of the limitations associated with using basic volumes. Basic volume is limited to only using partitions within the same single basic disk. In other words, a basic volume cannot span disks. You can't use space from a partition on one disk and space from a different partition on a different disk in a basic volume. For example, if we had two hard disk drives in our system and each hard disk drive had a partition on it, and they were both basic disks, then we could not create a basic volume that spans both of them, it just doesn't work. When we're dealing with a basic disk, we have to have a one to one relationshipbetween partitions and volumes. Also, if you have two partitions on a hard disk drive, then you can create two basic volumes.
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