Barriers Facilitators and Challenges The organizational assessment of BEMC was

Barriers facilitators and challenges the

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Barriers, Facilitators and Challenges The organizational assessment of BEMC was completed in January 2019 and supported organizational readiness for the implementation of a multimodal hand hygiene intervention. The biggest barrier was time and location of ABHR units. Staff did not feel they had enough time to wash with soap and water after each encounter with a patient and there were not enough ABHR units in hallways. A solution would be to propose to increase ABHR units in the hospital. Facilitators are education materials, training staff in proper hand hygiene, and stakeholder engagement. Feasibility Plan To test the feasibility of the plan, small tests of change can be done before taking changes system wide (Powell et al., 2015). This project was first implemented at the Burleson location. Based on the results of this project, modifications will be made as needed, then implemented in the remaining locations. Feasibility is high as cost is minimal to implement and maintain. The survey was created using SurveyMonkey software already in place at BEMC.
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26 Running Head: EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROPOSAL Other items used for this project include educational materials (e.g. paper and colored ink for flyers, posters, and displays). A full budget can be found in Appendix I. The funding for the magnetic reminders to “Wash In” “Wash Out” was obtained from the HA’s supply expense fund. Sustainability Sustainability refers to locking in the progress made by an improvement initiative. The success of any program can be attributed to the pride in ownership felt by those implementing and performing the daily tasks (APIC, 2015). Therefore, involving all staff at BEMC will help create sustainable change in hand hygiene practices. One strategy to ensure success is to involve staff and develop hand hygiene champions to encourage compliance, educate, and will be role models. Another strategy is to provide feedback on hand hygiene performance by displaying compliance data in breakrooms and discuss data at staff meetings. Engagement from BEMC leadership is essential for sustained improvement. They are a key resource for supporting hand hygiene practices, and they understand the impact hand hygiene has on HAIs and overall patient outcomes. Section G: Evaluation of Progress Rational for Methods To improve compliance with hand hygiene, a key component for strategies are monitoring and evaluating indicators that reflect these practices, as well as the knowledge and perception of hand hygiene practices (WHO, 2009). “The Model for Improvement was used for this project and is a framework for improvement efforts based on an iterative, trial-and-learning
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27 Running Head: EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROPOSAL approach” (Langley et al., 2009, p. 174). As evidenced by the literature reviewed for this study, a multi-modal approach is considered the best strategy for implementing sustainable hand hygiene improvement programs (APIC, 2015). This strategy includes a five-component approach from WHO-5 (WHO, 2018), which are visual cues, education, feedback, leadership
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