What is an excitatory synapse What is an inhibitory synapse For each one what

What is an excitatory synapse what is an inhibitory

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 16 pages.

What is an excitatory synapse? What is an inhibitory synapse? For each one, whation enters the cell? What does that do to the cell (depolarize or hyperpolarize it)? Does it make an action potential more or less likely? -Excitatory- a synapse in which an action potential in a presynaptic neuron increases the probability of an action potential occurring in a postsynaptic cell.Neurotransmitter opens sodium or calcium channels positively charged ions enter postsynaptic celldepolarization (excitation)more likely to have action potential.-Inhibitory- a kind of synaptic potential that makes a postsynaptic neuron less likely to generate an action potential. Neurotransmitter opens chloride channelsnegatively charged ions (chloride) enter postsynaptic cellhyperpolarization (inhibition) less likely to have action potential.Know what EPSP and IPSP are. How do these differ from an action potential?-EPSP- Excitatory post synaptic potentials-IPSP- Inhibitory post synaptic potentials-Synaptic potentials are graded, action potentials are all or none.-Synaptic potential happens at a synapse (postsynaptic), action potential happens down an axon.-Synaptic potential depends on ligand-gated channels, action potential depends on voltage-gated channels.NEUROTRANSMITTERS What is the difference between ionotropic and metabotropic receptors?find more resources at oneclass.comfind more resources at oneclass.com
Background image
-Ionotropic receptors form an ion channel pore. In contrast, metabotropic receptors are indirectly linked with ion channels on the plasma membrane of the cell through signal transduction mechanisms, often G proteins. Hence, G protein-coupled receptors are inherently metabotropic.What is the most common excitatory neurotransmitter? What is the most commoninhibitory neurotransmitter? -Excitatory- glutamate-Inhibitory- GABAWhat happens to neurotransmitters when they are released and how are they cleared from a synapse? -When released, they bind to receptors in postsynaptic membrane. They are cleared from a synapse by: 1) absorption by glia; 2) enzymatic degradation; 3) reuptake by presynaptic terminal.Know the terms agonist and antagonist.-Agonist: a drug that mimics or increasing the effects of a neurotransmitter.-Antagonist: a drug that blocks the effects of a neurotransmitter.DRUG ACTIONS AND SUBSTANCE ABUSEIn general, all drugs of abuse cause dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. Okay, not a question, but KNOW THAT!Stimulants: know some examples of stimulant drugs. What neurotransmitters do they increase? What are some behavioral effects?-Examples of stimulants- amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, ecstasy.-Affect monoamines, which include dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine.
Background image
Image of page 8

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture